Alzheimer’s Disease – Recent Data

Researcher’s gathered in Paris, France this month to present their data on new developments with Alzheimer’s disease.  In reviewing the meeting’s material, it is clear that much of what is “new” is old.

In the past we were taught that patients placed on medications for Alzheimer’s Disease would derive a benefit about 50% of the time. This benefit would last for six to twelve months.

One of the world’s authorities on this topic is Susan Rountree, M.D. of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.  She has followed 641 patients since the late 1980’s.  In 2008 she reported that patients treated with medicines such as donepezil (Aricept) and rivastigmine (Exelon) survived about three years longer than patients who did not take these medications.  She re-analyzed that data, updated it and came to the conclusion that “using anti-dementia drugs doesn’t seem to prolong survival.”   She did however recommend continuing their use because her data showed that patients taking them had improved cognition and ability to function.

At the Paris event there was material presented that was not surprising but needs the legitimacy of a well planned study to turn theory into scientific evidence and fact.

The study showing that military personnel who suffered traumatic brain injuries during the Vietnam War were more likely to develop dementia has great implications for today’s veterans fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan where brain injuries are on the rise.  It will clearly help us as well in terms of long-term planning for the development of dementia in private citizens suffering from traumatic brain injuries.  It was not surprising either when certain medications were cited as being more likely to contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s Disease. This year’s culprits seem to be anticholinergic drugs which make a patient’s mouth dry and cause constipation.

What was not surprising were the studies that showed that elderly individuals who engaged in regular and vigorous physical exercise were less likely to develop cognitive impairment.  Those patients who get regular and vigorous exercise who show signs of cognitive problems declined at a slower rate than those who don’t.

While much of the material discussed confirmed the fact that healthy lifestyle is the best defense against this disease; there was also much hopeful discussion of research which is untangling the relationship between brain chemicals, development of plaques in the brain and its relationship to Alzheimer’s. On an encouraging note, we are much closer to early detection and therapeutic intervention than we were a decade ago.

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