Medicare, if you only knew…

The following guest post was written by Aimee Seidman, M.D., FACP.  Dr. Seidman is an award winning internal medicine physician in Rockville, MD, a suburb of Washington, D.C.

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If I could have a penny for every dollar I saved Medicare, I’d be rich. As a concierge physician, my patients can expect advocacy that stretches from the office to the home, hospital, rehab facility, long term care setting, and to the hospice. When I work with a patient, they can expect me to intervene between the various subspecialty physicians or hospitalists involved in their care, spread out my arms in front of them as if ready to take a bullet for them, and defiantly yell “get your paws off my patient until we hear what the plan is”.

How often are x-rays, ultrasounds, MRI’s, cardiac caths, and yada, yada, yada done in patients with a shortened life expectancy, poor quality of life, or clear living will instructions? How often is patient autonomy ignored in the rush to ‘complete work-ups’? Why do we have to work everything up? We need to stop what we’re doing (and stop the cowboys who are shooting from the hip) and think about the patient’s status and whether or not the proposed intervention is appropriate.

The last time I asked one of my 80-101 year olds how aggressively they wanted their medical treatment to be, they said “no way…leave me the hell alone! When my time comes, it comes. Just make a nice party!“  I shudder to think of the feeding tubes inserted and other interventions done in clear violation of a living will, even if that living will is right there with the patient or family members present.

I believe we scare the daylights out of people by telling them all the horrible things that will happen if they don’t consent to treatment plans. But it’s all defensive medicine. “I’ve got to be able to document that I warned them about this horrible death so I don’t get sued”. I suspect non-intervention, comfort measures, and hospice care are rarely offered to families in a way they can hear it. ER doctors and hospital physicians are just doing their jobs-they want to ‘save lives’ (or at least keep them alive until the next shift) and the primary care doctor is never consulted.

What do people think we do, order mammograms all day? Those of us in concierge medicine who have close relationships with our patients know them and their families well enough to expedite decision-making in a way that is medically and ethically appropriate. The whole point of my concierge practice is to first, do no harm (remember that?), allow my late stage Alzheimers disease patient to have a dignified death, and not spend millions of dollars on unnecessary procedures.

Not only that (I’m almost done), if all primary care physicians and the health care community made a conscious effort to inquire about living wills, explain the subtleties, and respect the choices made, fewer people would use ambulances, go to the ER, stay in the hospital, etc.

The other piece to this is the education of families regarding end of life issues, preparation, ethics, and closure. As it is, families deal with guilt, sadness, confusion, and anger when called upon to make these tough decisions or to respect an established living will. Most of us have seen families reluctant to honor a living will because they can’t bear the thought of letting grandpa starve to death.

If consulted about these decisions ahead of time, much of the combat will not occur. So how much have I saved Medicare by avoiding all this unnecessary stuff? Tens of thousands of patients, times a fortune of money, equals a boatload of bucks.

So, do you want to know ways to fix health care?

1.      Tort reform so docs aren’t so paranoid and aren’t playing “cover-your-butt medicine”;

2.      Docs, shut up and listen to your patients;

3.      Stop insulting the community of doctors who want to practice medicine in a particular model labeling them elitist and focus on things that will work (and by the way, most of us have scholarship patients, indigent patients and perform community service);

4.      A national campaign to educate consumers about the importance of living wills and have discussions over details, including family members in the discussion;

5.      Make it clear to the medical community that honoring a patient’s autonomy in the form of an advance directive is their obligation under the law

6.      Do no harm.

Just listen to me and give me a penny for every dollar I save Medicare, then I’ll really be rich.

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Please note, the opinions expressed in this guest blog post are those of Dr. Aimee Seidman, founder of Rockville Concierge Doctors.

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