What’s New in Dementia, Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s Disease is a form of dementia and considered to be a progressive, fatal neurologic disease. Medications to slow it down are successful in about 50 % of patients for a very limited amount of time (6 -12 months).  As Baby Boomers age and move into the retirement sector, we are always looking for positive data regarding the disease to offset the expected epidemic of dementia.  We have a limited amount of good news to report.

Japanese researchers report that they have developed several types of contrast material for imaging studies which will allow doctors to see accumulating plaque in the brain and possibly the tangles of neurons associated with the disease at a much earlier stage.  At the same time researchers now claim to be able to do a spinal tap and, by examining the spinal fluid, make an earlier and more accurate diagnosis. At this point there might not yet be an advantage to early detection of the disease but as research proceeds it may become an important advantage.

The British Medical Journal is reporting that cognitive decline actually starts in midlife. They studied a mix of 7,300 men and women at five years intervals beginning in 1997 and found a decrease in intellectual functions beginning at 45 years old. They concluded that “what is good for our hearts is also good for our heads.”  They stressed the importance of controlling hypertension, obesity and abnormal cholesterol as a way to prevent dementia.

You might ask why I consider the fact that dementia begins in midlife a positive?  It’s a positive because we have the ability to control our weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and exercise level. Anytime a disease is modifiable by how we live our life we are given the chance to prevent it or limits its impact. This fact is supported by a recent study published in the Archives of Neurology looking at individuals with a genetic variant which predisposes them to develop Alzheimer’s Disease.  They found that older adults with the genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s Disease who exercised regularly, at or above the American Heart Association recommended levels, developed “amyloid deposits” on scans of their brain less than expected and in line with the general public who did not have a genetic predisposition to develop the disease.

These are small but positive steps in facing dementia. We can find it earlier and slow down or turn off genetic predisposition by living a healthy life.

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