FDA Approves Delays in Labeling Sunscreen Products

Under intense lobbying from the cosmetic and personal care industries, the Food and Drug Administration has wilted and granted sunscreen manufacturers an extra six months to clarify the efficacy of their products in terms of how they are labeled. Originally it was hoped that the new labeling would be in effect for the 2012 summer season with correct labeling required by June 17, 2012.  That has been pushed back to December 17, 2012.

It is widely known that sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or less do not provide total sun protection. The new labeling system was supposed to carry warnings so that consumers do not think they are getting more sun protection than they actually are.

Under the new regulations, manufacturers may no longer refer to their products as “sun block,” “waterproof,” “sweat proof,” or providing “ all day protection”.  If the product is SP15 or greater they may say that the product protects against sunburn, early signs of aging and skin cancer. Sunscreens that meet the FDA’s guidelines and protect against both ultraviolet A and B rays will be allowed to say they are “broad spectrum”.

The FDA claims the extra time was granted to allow testing of each product to determine if the product can justify its packaging claims. The delay was felt to be preferable to pulling products from the shelf in the summer sun exposure season.

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