Spray on Skin Cells Heal Wounds Fast

Non healing ulcers and wounds in the elderly are a common and severe problem. These skin breakdowns are painful, often get infected and often require wound care teams to treat the problem.  Robert Kirsner, MD, PhD of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Division of Dermatology reported in the online edition of the prestigious Lancet magazine that he is using a spray bottle containing a mix of skin cells called keratinocytes and fibroblasts to enhance the rate of healing.

Dr. Kirsner is looking at healing venous stasis ulcers of the legs. It is common to find venous insufficiency of the legs in senior citizens (poor return of blood from the legs through the veins and back towards the heart).  Venous ulceration and skin breakdown occur in 1 – 2.5% of these adults 65 years and older.  Treatment routinely consists of clearing and controlling infection with antibiotics, primary dressings and compression bandages and stockings. This is successful in 30% – 75% of the situations.  The remaining cases require skin grafting and surgical procedures to heal.

To treat this common and persistent problem, Dr Kirsner and associates have been working with a product known as HP802-247 which is a cryopreserved sampling of fibroblasts and keratinocytes derived from neonatal foreskin tissue that is discarded after circumcision of newborn infants. Thawed cells are suspended in a spray for application to a wound.   The researchers created three strengths of the spray and tested all against standard treatment.  All patients in the study, whether receiving the experimental spray or a placebo, received standard and traditional wound care.  Kirsner’s results show that by using the lowest dose of the spray he was able to achieve complete healing in almost a third more patients as compared with the placebo group.  Differences in the healing rate became apparent within the first week of the treatment.

The product, HP802-247, has shown enough improvement in healing rate and total healing to warrant advancing it to Phase III studies which have begun in the United States and Europe.  While the initial studies have looked only at wounds caused by venous insufficiency, it will be interesting to see if similar studies are initiated on additional slow healing wounds common in seniors as well as in burn unit situations.

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