The Benefits of Exercise and Fitness

Woman with DumbbellsThe highly acclaimed Cooper Clinic has been following 20,000 patients’ fitness levels for the last 40 years. They recently published an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine proclaiming that fitness in the middle years of life lowers your risk of developing dementia in your senior years. The Cooper Clinic has been following these patients for evaluation of cardiovascular fitness and development of heart disease but decided to use the same data to review who, if any, developed dementia by their 70th, 75th, 80th and 85th birthdays. All participants initially were screened with exercise treadmill testing. They found that those who were the fittest were 36% less likely to be diagnosed with dementia after age 65 than the least fit.

David Geldmacher, MD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, told MedPage Today that the potential benefit of exercise to reduce dementia risk is worth bringing up with patients, even though recommendations for exercise are made routinely for cardiovascular health reasons. Many patients are willing to forego exercise with the belief that sudden death by a heart related illness isn’t such a bad way to expire. On the other hand the thought of living with a chronic debilitating disease like dementia is highly undesirable and exercise might be an acceptable lifestyle change to prevent that process. Knowing that fitness can reduce the Alzheimer risk may give them further motivation to follow through with an exercise and fitness plan.

In an unrelated but equally fascinating study, researchers at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina found that Caucasian men who participated in regular exercise at a moderate level were less likely to have prostate cancer on biopsy of suspicious areas of the prostate. If the biopsy did reveal prostate cancer the grade of the cancer tended to be lower indicating a more favorable prognosis. This study of 164 Caucasian men and 143 black men did not show any fitness protection for black men who exercised regularly. The authors went on to point out the small size of the study and the fact that the level and frequency of exercise was self-reported not measured or monitored by the research team. Other factors such as heredity, diet and lifestyle issues may be factors as well. They recommended further study to determine the exact relationship between exercise and prostate health or disease.

Both these studies strongly support the concept that regular exercise of a moderate level probably has strongly favorable influences in multiple areas of health. I will continue to urge my patients to get some form of regular exercise that they enjoy on a daily basis while the researchers confirm the long term benefit of regular exercise and fitness.

Too Much Calcium May Be Harmful For Women

Front view of woman holding seedlingThe Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population based group that includes 61,433 women born between 1914 and 1948 with a median follow-up of 19 years was used to answer the question of whether calcium intake can be harmful? The research team analyzed food intake by questionnaires and estimated the total calcium intake from food and supplements in the study group. Participants were divided into groups based on total daily calcium intake. One group consumed less than 600 mg of calcium per day. A second group consumed between 6000 and 999 mg a day. Group three consumed 1,000 to 1,399 mg per day. The last group consumed more than 1400 mg a day or the equivalent of drinking five 8 ounce glasses of cow’s milk.

The study was led by Karl Michaelsson, MD, of Uppsala University in Sweden and published in the online edition of the British Medical Journal. They found that the group consuming 1400 mg or more per day of calcium had a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, ischemic coronary disease and all causes than expected. The high calcium intake did not however increase the risk for strokes. At the other end of the spectrum were those individuals on an extremely low calcium diet with less than 600 mg per day. They were found to have an increased risk of death as well from all the causes mentioned above plus stroke.

Once again this appears to be a call for moderation in one’s diet. Too much or too little of anything is associated with consequences. At the current time postmenopausal women are advised to consume 1600 mg of calcium a day between diet and supplements. It may be time to look at that number and see how it applies to North American women as opposed to Swedish women who participated in this project.