Benefits of Smoking Cessation Outweigh Negatives of Weight Gain

A196HJ Woman smoking a cigarette Exhaling tobacco smokeIf you wish to extend your life and stay healthy then giving up smoking tobacco is a major positive step. The benefits include an immediate drop in your cardiovascular disease risk profile, a drop in the possibility of developing numerous types of cancer and a decrease in the likelihood of developing chronic obstructive lung disease.

Smoking is an expensive, dirty habit that not only sickens you but exposes those around you to an increased chance of disease due to others breathing in your second hand smoke. Asthma in children is now believed to be related to the children’s exposure to their parents’ second hand smoke. One of the negatives of stopping smoking is that individuals tend to put on weight. Weight gain and obesity are known risk factors for the development of heart disease and vascular disease.

In the March 13th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Carole Clair, MD, of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland examined the question of whether the weight gain was detrimental to your heart health. She accessed data from the famed and long term Framingham Offspring Study looking at the years 1984 through 2011 for 3251 study participants who were free of cardiovascular disease at the start of the analysis. These participants underwent a checkup every four years and were placed into categories such as “recent quitter” (stopped smoking within 4 years),” long term quitter” (nonsmoker for > 4 years) and nonsmoker.

As anticipated, smoking cessation was associated with a weight gain of 5.9 lbs. in the recent quitters and 1.9 lbs. in the long term quitters. Smokers also gained weight during the study period while the country underwent and obesity epidemic. Smokers gained an average of 1.9 lbs. while nonsmokers gained about 3 lbs.

They followed these people for 25 years and defined 631 “cardiovascular events.” In reviewing the data they concluded that former smokers had about one half the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as smokers. When they factored in the weight gain associated with smoking cessation it had no effect on the reduction in cardiovascular disease.

They concluded that the findings support, “a net cardiovascular benefit of smoking cessation, despite subsequent weight gain.” The goal is clear. Stop smoking and then we will work on the weight gain.