Increasing Dietary Fiber Decreases Your Stroke Risk

Fruits and vegetables v2Diane Threapleton, MSC, of the University of Leeds, England, and colleagues reported in the online version of Stroke that eating more dietary fiber may modestly reduce your chances of having a stroke. Additional grams of dietary fiber intake was associated with a 7% lower risk of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke.  She said a 7 gram per day increase in fiber is easy to achieve being the equivalent of two servings of fruit like apples or oranges or an extra serving of beans.

United States guidelines call for the average man to consume 30 – 38 grams of fiber per day while the average women should consume 21-25 grams.  We fall far short of that with the average male consuming only 17 grams of fiber per day and the average woman only 13 grams.

Researchers note that soluble types of fiber form gels in the stomach and bowels, slowing the rate of absorption of foods and slowing gastric emptying. This slowed emptying increases our feelings of being full so we consume less food. They additionally noted “bacterial fermentation of resistant starch and soluble fibers in the large intestine producing short chain fatty acids which inhibit cholesterol synthesis by the liver and lowering serum levels.”

Once again, nutritional common sense prevails. Eating healthy, including more fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grain products results in more fiber ingested and fewer health issues occurring.