Fitness in Mid-life Leads to Less Illness in Later Life

Woman with DumbbellsAt doctor/patient visits, physicians stress the importance of developing and following a healthy lifestyle. That healthy lifestyle includes eating correctly and in moderation, controlling your weight, going for periodic benchmarking checkups and getting regular and consistent exercise. An untold number of research studies have supported these recommendations.  Medpage, the online medical journal of the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine printed two reviews of studies which confirm the findings.

Ambrish Pandey, MD, of the prestigious University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas with his colleagues presented data that links fitness in your fifties with a reduced risk of cardiovascular heart failure in later life.  They looked at 9,050 men and women with an average age of 48 and followed them for a period of eight years. They evaluated their fitness at entry into the study and eight years later. They followed patients for 60,635 patient years.  

Their findings were quite simple. Those people who exercised regularly and improved their fitness over time had less heart disease and heart failure. They proved that your risk of cardiovascular disease in your sixties and seventies was modifiable based on your fitness level and effort to improve it and sustain it.

Susan Lakoski, MD, of the University of Vermont in Burlington looked at fitness in men in their fifties and concluded that “physical fitness reduces the risk of lung and colorectal cancer”.  She pointed out that if fit men developed cancer they tended to have a higher survival rate than unfit men. Interestingly, her study suggested that weight was NOT the issue.  Overweight men who were fit did well, while unfit lean men did not do as well.

It is refreshing to have data to back up the recommendations we make to our patients – find some form of exercise they enjoy and keep doing it, frequently and repeatedly if you wish to have fewer health issues to deal with as you age.

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