Fish Consumption and Reduction of Risk of Developing Breast Cancer

Fish v2MedPage, the online medical journal of the University of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine reviewed an article published in the British Medical Journal concerning a relationship between consumption of marine fish oil from fish and a reduction in the risk of developing breast cancer. The study was published by Duo Li, MD, a professor of nutrition at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China. They reviewed data from 21 “prospective cohort studies involving nearly 900,000 people”. According to their data, eating just one or two portions a week of salmon, sardines, mackerel or other fish rich in marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with a 1 % reduced risk of breast cancer in later life. Their data came from questionnaires that asked about patients’ intake of fatty acids and from blood levels measured in several studies. When they looked at similar fatty acids which come from plants not fish, such as alpha linoleic acid, they could not see a similar protective effect.

The study was critiqued by Alice H Lichtenstein, DSc, director for the cardiovascular nutrition lab at Tufts University. She had numerous questions and concerns about the methodology and conclusions but did support the need for future prospective studies to examine this question. While I have neither the credentials nor experience of Dr. Lichtenstein in evaluating this type of data I believe strongly in the KISS (keep it simple stupid) principle. Fleshy fish provides fish oils which are felt to be beneficial to our health. The same cannot be said for fish oils which you receive in pills and preparations.

My advice is to eat fish two or three times per week. Prepare it simply in a Mediterranean diet style and obtain the benefits that research seems to consistently show for this eating pattern.

Exercise May Protect Against Memory Loss of Aging

Senior Citizens, exercise v2Dorothy Edwards, PhD of the University of Wisconsin in Madison and colleagues presented a study at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference this week that implies that physical exercise and activity slows down or prevents age related memory loss in patients considered high risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease or Minimal Cognitive Impairment. The data was presented in the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine on line journal MedPage.

The study showed that the brain hippocampus was more resistant to the memory loss effects of aging in a population that had first degree relatives with dementia and who exercised aggressively. Past research has shown that physical exercise stimulates “neurogenesis “in the hippocampus.

Maria Carrillo, PhD, vice president of medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer’s Association said, “We already know that exercise is important in terms of all sorts of health measures. Now it appears that over time, it also had benefits in preserving memory and other aspects of cognition, even in high risk people.”

The study of 317 patients is one more supporting piece of evidence that should be encouraging us all to get out and walk, cycle, swim, run and participate in whatever physical activities we find enjoyable to do. The health benefits are too important to ignore.