Chianti Study Refutes Wines Heart Healthy Label

ChiantiResveratrol, the antioxidant found in red wine, grapes, and dark chocolate did not increase longevity or lower the risk of cancer or heart disease in a study conducted in the Italian wine country. The study, led by Richard D. Semba, MD, MPH of the Johns Hopkins University looked at older adults in the Chianti wine making region of Italy with the top dietary intake of resveratrol as indicated by its urinary metabolites. Large consumers were no more or less likely to die over the 9 year study period as small consumers or those who abstained. The actual data showed that those in the lowest consumption range did better than others as reported in the online edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Inflammatory markers, cardiovascular disease, and cancer all showed the same lack of a significant relationship with resveratrol levels. “The results were different than all of our theories” and hopes. Resveratrol had been hailed as a major component of red wine and dark chocolate and is supposed to be heart healthy. This has led to the growth of sales for it as a supplement. Sales in the USA exceed $30 million dollars per year despite no clinical evidence of its benefits. It is still promoted heavily by noted cardiologist and health televangelist Dr Oz. Derek Lowe, PhD, a drug researcher, doesn’t understand the popularity of the substance. “Personally, I do not see why anyone would take resveratrol supplements.” If it does have an effect it’s sure not a very robust or reproducible one.” The Aging in Chianti Study involved 783 men and women followed from 1998 until 2009. There was no significant difference in cardiovascular disease rates among those with the lowest levels of the drugs metabolite and those with the highest. There were no differences in the incidence of cancer between high consumers of red wine and modest to low consumers either.

While the study clearly did not show any benefit during the study period, critics of the study and its conclusion felt that maybe the benefits were more long term and required a higher dose of resveratrol over a longer period to see any real benefits. Once again I believe consuming dark chocolate and red wine in moderation is probably your best course. It is clear that a larger study with different concentrations of resveratrol over a longer period of time will be needed to reach a definitive conclusion. The study did not show that resveratrol was bad for you either. That being the case, individuals should enjoy their dark chocolate and red wine in moderate measured amounts because they enjoy dark chocolate and red wine.

Viagra, Cialis and Levitra Use and Malignant Melanoma

Risk v1Jiali Han, Ph.D of the Indiana University School of Public Health in Indianapolis reported in JAMA that use of Viagra or sildenafil was associated with an 84% greater risk of malignant melanoma. Their preliminary data obtained from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) looked at 51,529 men aged 40 – 75 years old and all health professionals. Beginning in 1986 these individuals filled out a detailed health questionnaire every other year. The researchers reached their conclusions after reviewing the 2,000 HPFS survey and excluding all participants with a history of melanoma, squamous cell cancer or basal cell skin cancer prior to calendar year 2000. They were left with 25,848 men who had a mean baseline age of 64.8 years. 5.3 % of these men (1370) reported use of sildenafil (Viagra). From 2000 until 2010 142 melanomas were reported in that group.

The authors theorize that Viagra and the other drugs promote tumor growth by inadvertently inhibiting our immune system’s ability to suppress tumor growth messages at the genetic and molecular level. They emphasize that this is a preliminary study that does not prove cause and effect but does generate enough concern to warrant the creation of a study to answer the question” Our data provide epidemiological evidence on possible skin adverse effects of PDE5A inhibitors and support continued investigation of this relationship.” There was no mention of frequency of use or dosage and development of melanoma.

The authors were clear that if the relationship does in fact hold true, it extends to all the drugs in this class. Considering the billions of dollars in pharmaceutical profit involved it is hard to imagine that the question will not be addressed in a well-planned and funded study.

Extreme Intensity Exercise Good for the Ego But Maybe Not for the Heart

ExerciseHealth experts have encouraged regular moderate level exercise for adults 5-7 days a week lasting 30 – 60 minutes per session to stay heart healthy.  We talk about walking 15 – 20 minute miles while being able to comfortably carry on a conversation as your suggested goal. We all see other adults appearing far more fit and aggressive working out daily at a much quicker and much more strenuous pace. Experts have always wondered if they are healthier and if they fare better?

Two articles addressing this issue appear in the journal Heart. Researcher Ute Mons, MA, of the German Cancer Research Institute found that men with known stable coronary artery disease who exercised strenuously daily had more than a two fold increase in cardiovascular mortality compared to men with CAD who exercised 2 -4 times per week at a moderate level. The study was the first of its kind to look at different levels of exercise and frequencies of exercise. Certainly more research is now required to verify these findings in studies which do not rely on patient self reporting of how often, how hard and how long you work out. It is also critical to remember that this study was conducted on individuals known to have heart disease.  The message to them should be clear to exercise moderately for the most benefit and least risk. The study says nothing about the benefits or risks of individuals without cardiovascular disease who exercise moderately versus strenuously.

In another related article men at age 30 who reported exercising 5 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing the arrhythmia atrial fibrillation as compared to those who exercised more modestly. While these were both excellent preliminary works requiring further study, they both point toward moderation once again as the healthiest and best lifestyle path.

Skipping Breakfast May Be Fine For Weight Loss

Scale and foodEmily Dhurandhar, Ph.D, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham is a nutritionist who does not believe in following myths and dogma unless there is sufficient research and evidence to back it up. She recently led a team of researchers who looked at the question of whether skipping breakfast was a hindrance to weight loss. Her group conducted the first controlled randomized study on the topic looking at 309 overweight and obese patients over a 16 week period. Patients were assigned to one of three groups:

1.            An intervention group told to eat breakfast

2.            An intervention group told to skip breakfast

3.            A control group not specifically instructed to do eat or skip breakfast

They were all placed on a caloric restricted diet. The results of the study showed that the only thing that mattered in weight loss was whether your intake of calories was less than calories used during the day. The time of day we first eat had no effect on weight loss in this study.

Dr. Dhurandhar reasoned that none of us actually skip breakfast since our first meal of the day after a prolonged overnight fast is still breakfast. The study only looked at weight loss related to skipping or eating breakfast. It did not answer the other age old dietary question of whether eating a large calorie amount late at night and then retiring affects your weight. For those of you who enjoy sleeping in, this is excellent news.