Medical Costs Rise as Retirees Winter in Florida

Healthcare CostsIn the January 31, 2015 edition of the NY Times, Elisabeth Rosenthal writes about the high numbers of tests performed on seasonal visitors to the state of Florida in the winter (as if seasonal visitors to Florida requiring health care are a new phenomenon). She cites a NY Times analysis of Medicare data released for 2012 showing twice the number of nuclear stress tests, echocardiograms and vascular ultrasounds for Medicare beneficiaries in Florida than in Massachusetts. She blames it on Florida cardiologists purchasing medical testing equipment for their offices and doing a large volume of tests to recover much of the income lost to a drop in reimbursement rates by Medicare to doctors for actually seeing patients, examining them and providing care. The article then goes on to discuss the increased number of tests in Florida in the last two years of a patient’s life compared to other areas of the country. She does admit that senior citizen rich population centers in NY, California, Arizona, South Texas and South Nevada have similar data showing high rates of testing than the rest of the country, but this is passed off as an afterthought. There are then a slew of anecdotal stories about individuals advised to undergo a procedure or test who declined and recovered nicely without it being done.

I have a suggestion for the NY Times, New York magazine and all the online purveyors of pearls of wisdom on health care. Suggest that your readers vacationing in Florida for the winter find a primary care physician (PCP). Find one who is willing to review the patients’ medical records from their northern physician and share clinical decision making on important issues with the physician(s) who know them longest and best.

For many years these prestigious periodicals have been suggesting that the patients’ only see a specialist. If the patients do not self-refer themselves to a specialist, their children often self-refer them to a specialist. Most specialty physicians are ethical, moral practitioners not churning out tests for self-profit. You can avoid the ones over utilizing at your expense by finding a well-trained internist or family practitioner who has no x-ray suite in the office, no nuclear stress testing equipment, no echocardiogram machines and no extensive in house laboratory. You probably won’t find that type of doctor if your physician is an employee of a hospital based health care system or Accountable Care Organization where the facility fee and incentives to over utilize are very strong. You won’t find that if you use the Emergency Room or a walk in center as your primary care physician because the same incentives exist.

You can find this dying breed of physician (dying because Medicare reimbursement for their services and influential periodicals have driven them out of existence) by calling the local county medical society or the local hospital medical staff offices and asking for a board certified internist or family practitioner who is not employed by the hospital or one of its large health care systems.

Consider a concierge or direct pay practice as well. The customer services in those practices, and additional patient time the doctors have, allows them to get the full story and communicate with those doctors who know you best rather than just shuffle you off for tests.  After all, time is the essence of quality, especially when it comes to healthcare.

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