SPRINT Study Supports More Aggressive Blood Pressure Targets

For several years now there has been a growing controversy over how low to lower blood pressure to reduce health risks. The most recent recommendations were to lower systolic BP to 140 or lower in men and women less than 60 years old, with a higher systolic blood pressure of 150 in those over 60 years older. There has been much recent concern that if we lower systolic blood pressure too much in senior citizens we fail to perfuse the brain with needed blood supply carrying oxygen and nutrients. The end result is a clinical appearance of dementia or cognitive impairment. Researchers recognize that to achieve a systolic blood pressure of less than 140 most patients need to take at least two blood pressure pills. There has been a great deal of difficulty convincing patients to consistently take those two blood pressure pills so the thought of adding a third medication to achieve a systolic BP of 120 or less is quite challenging.

To answer the question of how low to optimally lower blood pressure, the National Heart and Lung Institute instituted the SPRINT study looking at 9300 men and women over age 50 that had high blood pressure. One group was attempting to lower systolic blood pressure to 120 or less. The other to 140 or less. The study was scheduled to run through 2016 and conclude in 2017. The goal was to see if the lower blood pressure reduced the number of heart attacks and strokes. Last week the Federal government announced that the reduction in heart attacks and strokes in the aggressively treated group was so pronounced that they were stopping the study early. With the lower systolic BP the heart attack and stroke risk was reduced by nearly a third and the death risk by 25%. To achieve the desired systolic blood pressure of 120 or less required the daily use of three distinct blood pressure medications per patient.

In the process of cutting the study short to announce the results for the public’s benefit, the researchers were not able to answer the question of whether senior citizens would suffer more falls from getting dizzy with the lower pressure or if the lower pressure resulted in more cognitive impairment and dementia due to hypoperfusion of the brain. The only question they answered is that a lower target blood pressure will result in less death due to heart attacks and strokes. They did not address the issue of whether lower blood pressures would result in less chronic kidney disease either.

There are many academic researchers who hail the SPRINT study as cutting edge in further reducing cardiovascular injury and death. Other researchers are peeved at the failure to look at the effects on dizziness, falls, dementia like symptoms and kidney function with the lower blood pressure in our elderly population. As a practicing clinician I will look at each patient situation individually. I will suggest maximizing lifestyle issues such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, lipid control and sensible exercise before adding additional medications to lower blood pressure even more. We will recognize that many of you are already on two blood pressure medicines, an antiplatelet agent, a lipid lowering agent plus other medications before we add a third class of blood pressure medicine to get your systolic blood pressure even lower. With the side effect profile of most blood pressure medications including electrolyte imbalances, fatigue, effects on frequency of urination and sexual function, we must consider the individual pros and cons of further lowering BP by additional medication very carefully.

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