Dealing with Pain Physicians Should not be so Painful

The State of Florida is trying to eliminate medical practitioners and facilities which prescribe narcotics freely without doing the proper evaluations. These pill mills sell drugs for cash and the resulting overprescribing of oral narcotics has flooded the streets of Florida and nearby states with oral pills leading to increased opioid related deaths and trips to the emergency departments for drug overdoses. The frenzy has been fueled by “blue ribbon physician panels” discouraging the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain in favor of narcotics. The Florida Legislature responded by passing draconian legislation that separated opioid pain prescribing into acute prescriptions which all physicians may prescribe and chronic prescribing. For chronic prescribing health care providers must take a course and check a special box on their licensing reapplication form every two years. Pharmacies are coming under scrutiny for providing refills of short acting narcotics for pain when they have been refilled well past the 8 week suggested limit on these medications, even if the prescription is appropriately written by a legitimate physician. The pressure on the pharmacies by the state and law enforcement has led to a policy of not stocking narcotics or filling narcotic prescriptions at many Florida pharmacies. Sick patients with well documented sources of pain and legal prescriptions search endlessly for a pharmacy to fill their pain medications.

The Florida pain law encouraged the growth of pain specialist doctors especially anesthesiologists, rheumatologists and psychiatrists. I treat an elderly population of chronically ill patients many with severe long term chronic back, hip and joint problems. They arrive at my practice with a history of long term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications for pain relief and many are using opioid narcotics for years. When referred to many of the pain specialists they are integrated into a conveyor belt type operation using injections of medications into joints, physical therapy with very little attention paid to the patient’s medical history. Most of the pain doctors prefer using injection techniques rather than working with oral or injectable medications, physical therapy, counseling or any of the alternative therapies.. The patients receive their series usually of three shots into an area of the body and then are expected to be able to tolerate their pain. The problem is that during the series of injections and after the series of injections, if the pain relief has been incomplete or inadequate, there is little time set aside to discuss what to do when it really still hurts. The result is that the patients call a doctor who actually answers the phones and returns calls promptly even if that physician does not have a degree in pain management or a large volume practice injecting joints for pain relief. That doctor is left with the option of prescribing the very oral medications we are being advised not to use, or chasing down the pain doctor to discuss exactly how they wish to address the problem? Usually the pain doctors are very willing to take ownership of the situation and they make suggestions of oral medications for that particular instance. The problem then usually recurs before the next round of injections or shortly after. There are very few pain practices actually talking to patients, examining them and working with oral medications or transdermal medications to relieve pain. They just do not have the time to discuss the situation especially with the procedures being so much more profitable. It is much like the situation in psychiatry where so many of the practitioners see patients briefly to adjust or regulate medications but spend little time engaging in counseling or psychotherapy any more.

There are however, several local pain doctors, who have answered my calls for assistance regarding patients having multiple cognitive and behavioral problems due to chronic use of opioid medications for legitimate pain. They have spent time analyzing the situation and helped the patients successfully withdraw from ineffective treatment regimens and resume a productive life. These clinicians are few and overwhelmed with chronic pain patients. The solution to the problem is an updating or retraining of our health care provider population so that more practitioners are comfortable treating chronic pain. At the same time our elected officials and law enforcement need to establish a system which prevents prescribers of pain medications from profiting from the dispensing or distribution of these products. Until that occurs I will continue to get phone calls from patients saying, “I had my third shot three days ago and I am still in excruciating pain. I cannot reach my pain doctor but their PA says I cannot get another shot for another three months. What should I do about the terrible pain?”

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