How Often Do Screening Colonoscopies Result in a Complication?

Harlan Krumholz, MD is the director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE). His team at Yale is being paid extraordinarily well to determine what works and what doesn’t in Medicare. Their data will theoretically allow Medicare to issue payment for services based on success rates of care without complications. His group is part of a national program promoted by the Center for Medicare Services (CMS) to spend less for more effective high quality care. This in my humble opinion is “voodoo” health care policy.

One of their areas of interest is trips to the emergency room or hospital within 7 – 14 days of a colonoscopy. They developed a formula to look at this problem and applied it to Medicare claims data in the year 2010 in NY, Nebraska, Florida and California. They found 1.6% of healthy individuals going for screening colonoscopy ended up at the hospital within seven days. They found wide variations in this rate coming from different facilities and different doctors. When the data is extrapolated to the 1.7 million Medicare beneficiaries undergoing screening colonoscopy annually it indicates there will be at least 27,000 unplanned hospital visits within seven days of the procedure.

Determining what causes complications of a screening procedure so we can determine a root cause and then prevent it is a good thing. However; the research needs to be done by independent groups not receiving funds from CMS which has a clear and strong conflict of interest!

We need to be looking at complications related to the choice of preparation, choice of colonoscopy, choice of anesthesia and whether polyps were removed and or biopsies taken. We additionally need to assess the definition of “low risk patient.”

Within the recommended age group for screening colonoscopies of 50-75 years old, very few patients are not taking prescription medications as well as supplements. The research needs to look at procedures such as CT Scan virtual colonoscopy and fecal immunochemical human occult blood testing as well for efficacy and complication rate.

There are currently DNA analysis tests of columnar epithelium colon cells sloughed during a normal bowel movement. Pre-cancerous polyps and colon cancer have distinctive DNA patterns that can be detected by looking at fecal material. There is no prep but the cost of $500 makes determining if it works and under what circumstances important. If it works then shouldn’t it be the screening test to determine who needs to have a colonoscopy? Yes, the research must be done but it must be done by agencies not affiliated with CMS with their stated goal of spending less for better service and better quality.

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