Vitamin D in Senior Citizens: How Much is Enough?

Vitamin D levels are the most popular blood test being billed to CMS Medicare and private insurers. The World Health Organization considers 20 ng/ml to be a normal level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D which contrasts with 30ng/ml in the USA. Vitamin D is made by the kidney when our limbs get exposed to sufficient sun light. It is low in severe and chronic states. Supplementing Vitamin D does not improve the illness except possibly in multiple sclerosis but can return the serum level to normal.

Experts in fall prevention hoped that supplying adequate vitamin D will preserve muscle function and reduce falling. About one in three elderly experience a fall annually with one fracture per five falls. In the USA this amounts to 250,000 hospital admissions for hip fracture each year. The research hope was that by raising the Vitamin D level to 30 we would reduce falls and fractures.  Unfortunately individuals 70 years or older who took 2000IU of Vitamin D a day or 60,000units per month, had more falls and a higher risk of falls than seniors who had lower serum levels and less supplementation. Their muscle function improved with higher dose vitamin D but so did the falls.

The Institute of Medicine, an independent US advisory panel advises taking 800 IU per day or 24,000 IU per month with a goal of a serum level of 21-30 and less frequent Vitamin D level monitoring.

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