Increased Dementia Risk in Senior Citizens Due to Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)

Brittany Haenisch, PhD of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Bonn, has reported in JAMA Neurology, a study from health insurance data suggesting that taking Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) such as Aciphex (omeprazole), Protonix (pantoprazole), Nexium (esomeprazole), and Prevacid (lansoprazole), was associated with a markedly increased risk of developing dementia. The correlation was stronger in men than women with a slightly increased risk for those taking Nexium.

The study, conducted from 2004 through 2011, looked at 73,679 people age 75 years or older and who were free of dementia at “baseline”.  It revealed 29,510 patients (40%) developed dementia and, of these, almost 3,000 (average age of 84) were taking a PPI medication. The authors concluded that avoiding PPIs may prevent dementia.

All of these medicines are now freely sold over the counter not requiring a prescription. Their use has dramatically increased. There is belief from animal studies that PPIs cross the blood brain barrier and effect the production of amyloid and tau protein associated with dementia. In humans, B12 levels can be lowered effecting cognitive ability. None of this data shows a clear cause and effect relationship so we cannot say PPIs hasten the onset or cause dementia. Newer well designed controlled and blinded studies will be needed for this purpose.

In the interim, I will ask my patients to reduce or avoid these medications. We can treat heartburn and indigestion with products such as antacids, weight loss, eating smaller portions and staying upright after those meals, loosening your belt at the waist and avoiding those foods that reduce lower esophageal sphincter muscle pressure leading to reflux.

There will be some with conditions such as Barret’s Esophagus, which is precancerous, and recent bleeding ulcers which require the use of PPIs for eight or more weeks and then switch to Tums, Rolaids, Gaviscon or Carafate. Some patients will need the PPIs for symptom relief beyond eight weeks and they will need to make a tough decision between symptom relief and increased dementia risk while the researchers search for the answer.

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