How Much of Yourself Can You Give to Others?

I have been practicing general internal medicine for over 35 years in the same community. I have many patients who started with me in 1979 and are now in their late eighties to early nineties.  Predictably and sadly they are failing.  Not a week goes by without one or two of them moving from general medical care to palliative care, very often with the involvement of Hospice for end of life care.   Medicare may now compensate for discussion of end of life issues but anyone practicing general internal medicine or family practice has been discussing end of life issues appropriately for years with no compensation. It just comes with the territory.

Most of us still practicing primary care thrive on being able to improve our patient’s quality of life and our major compensation can be hearing about their interactions and social engagements with family and friends.  It is an accomplishment to see you’re 90 year old with multisystem disease for years, dance at her great grandchild’s wedding.  No one who cares for patients longitudinally for years is that dispassionate that they do not give up a piece of their heart and soul each time they lose a patient or have one take a turn for the worse.   When I lose a patient, if time permits, I will attend the funeral or family grieving gathering during the mourning period.  Everyone gets a personal hand written letter. Completion of the circle of life and then moving on is part of the process.

I think physicians’ families take the brunt of this caring and I am sure mine does. As much as you want to have time and patience and sympathy and empathy for your loved ones, the work truly drains your tank and reserve. When you answer the questions of the elderly and their families over and over, often the same questions, it drains you.  Unfortunately, I believe my elderly failing mother is cheated the most by this process. Last weekend when making my weekly visit she was complaining again about the same things, asking the same questions that have repeatedly and compassionately been addressed by my brother and I. My wife interjected that I sounded angry and annoyed. I was. I told her that unfortunately all the compassion and understanding in me had been drained already today and I needed time to recharge.

I saw the widow of a patient who expired last month in his nineties. I had offered to make home visits and they were declined several times by the patient and his spouse. His last week of life he asked to receive Hospice care and they assumed his care.  I called the surviving spouse and wrote what I considered a personal letter of condolence.  His wife told me she was disappointed in me for not coming up to see him one last time. I apologized for not meeting their needs but wondered inwardly, how much can I give and still have something left for myself and my loved ones?

PCSK9 Inhibitors Not All They Are Cranked Up To Be

For months now physicians treating patients with elevated cholesterol have been looking forward to learning how to use the new monthly injectable PCSK9 inhibitor medicines that were touted to dramatically lower LDL cholesterol and cause far fewer side effects. They were designed to be used in patients with a hereditary form of elevated cholesterol traditionally very hard to control with oral statin medications and for statin intolerant patients with coronary artery disease.

The drawbacks to the new medication is its costly nature running more than $1,200 a month with many insurers, including Medicare, not yet covering it. There were additional concerns that the lowering of LDL cholesterol was so dramatic that it may cause problems in other organ systems that require cholesterol for certain functions.

The April 3rd edition of the University of Pennsylvania’s online Medical Review known as MedPage Today revealed data from Steven E Nissan, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic on the use of evolocumab (Repatha) in the phase III GAUSS -3 trial. This study looked at statin intolerant patients who had failed on two previous statin drugs or were unable to raise the statin dose from the minimal available level.  This study compared the effects of Repatha to oral Zetia (ezetimibe) at 22 and 24 weeks.  The study clearly showed that Repatha lowered LDL cholesterol levels by about 55% compared to ezetimibe at 17%.  The level of LDL cholesterol level was similar to results of the other cholesterol lowering PCSK9 inhibitor alirocumab (Praluent).

What I found most interesting is not that these expensive new injectables worked well but that 20% of the statin intolerant patients had similar muscular aches and pains and complaints with this new non statin injectable. Less than one percent of the patients on the new injectable in the study actually stopped the drug due to the muscular pains.

At this point my practice is still investigating the new injectables. Part of that investigation is determining which insurers will pay for the use of the drug and which will not.  In the past I have waited a good year for a new type of medication to be out on the US market to observe the true adverse risk profile before prescribing it. This promising injectable monoclonal antibody to reduce LDL cholesterol will be treated no differently.

Changes Coming to Medicare Soon

CMS (Center for Medicare Services) is determined to eliminate fee for service medicine. Fee for service medicine is the system where patients see a physician or “provider” for a visit or service and the “physician or provider” bills the patient or Medicare for each service provided.  CMS argues that “providers” are seeing too much volume and providing too many services thus driving up the cost of health care and the percentage of the Gross National Product that healthcare consumes.  To contain costs they have come up with the public relations mantra of the “Triple Aim.”  The triple aim includes improving the global health of the US population while improving quality and reducing overall costs.  The true emphasis is on reducing overall costs!

To reach their goals, CMS is changing the way it pays for health care and services. By 2019, less than three years from now, CMS hopes to pay one flat fee per beneficiary to large health care organizations ( think HMOs) thus fixing their costs. That large organization will then be responsible for providing total care to a local population.   Hospitals and large health care systems have been purchasing physician practices and employing the doctors in organizations known as Accountable Care Organizations (ACO’s). These health systems believe that by employing the doctors they will control their ordering and spending habits and reduce costs to the overall system. They hope to drive an aging private community physician population into early retirement or at least to stop coming to the hospitals to care for their own patients. They still want these patients to come to their hospital for care but want their employed physicians to provide the care.

If you look around the community you will notice that the major hematologic and oncology groups are now owned by Boca Raton Regional Hospital, as is the major surgical group, several cardiology groups and a host of internists and family practitioners.  The hospital has additionally partnered with its contracted emergency room physicians to open numerous walk in clinics in young population centers to capture that business. At the same time that our local regional hospital is purchasing practices and discouraging local private physicians from continuing to practice, they have introduced a residency training program in internal medicine and surgery. By the fall of 2017 we can expect 100 internal medicine physicians and up to 45 surgical physicians fresh out of medical school and beginning their training, to be serving as a cheap physician labor force for Boca Regional Hospital.  The hope is that ultimately, the Charles Schmidt College of Medicine at FAU will attract and develop a clinical faculty worthy of a university and academic medical center that will enhance medical care in our area but until then we will always wonder, as anesthesia puts us to sleep, who actually is performing our surgical procedures?   Additionally one wonders if you become ill with a serious illness, will you be permitted and covered to see the best physician at the best institution for your problem or will you be required to stay in a narrow network of local providers contracted with the local health entity?

If physicians choose not to join a large health system organization as an employee they will be required to be part of a merit based payment system.  Government administrators, employers and private insurers are certain they can define and quantitate “quality care.”  It is unclear whether there is any meaningful evidence of what “quality care” really is.   Quality care will include parameters like patient satisfaction ( if you are not given an antibiotic for your viral illness or a narcotic pain medicine for your injury appropriately based on the illness or injury will the provider be given a low patient satisfaction grade?), did you counsel an obese patient to lose weight?  Did you counsel a tobacco smoker to stop?  Did you intervene to control a patient’s blood pressure?  All the data entry will require the physician to spend time in front of the computer screen checking more boxes and less time in face-to-face patient care.  Computers will need to communicate with each other from the office to the hospital to the lab etc. but it is unclear who will pay for this? At the end of each year the doctors will be required to send all their patient care data electronically to CMS for review.

Many physicians will choose to just leave or “opt out” of the Medicare system. They will contract privately with patients and be able to order tests and studies at approved institutions but they will not be reimbursed by Medicare for their services nor will the patient be reimbursed by Medicare for the cost of those doctors’ visits and services.  In most areas of the country where the population is not overwhelmingly composed of senior citizens 65 years of age or older, doctors have stopped seeing Medicare patients for just this reason. This may become the norm rather than the exception in South Florida as well.

For the moment my concierge practice is not changing anything. We continue to participate in all the CMS quality programs such as Meaningful Use and PQRS , vaccine registry and Eforcse (a controlled substance prescribing data base) despite the cost and time involved just to leave our future options open. I remain committed to giving my patients longer quality visits and following them where possible into the hospital when they need hospital services. As patients and citizens it is urgent that you become familiar with what CMS and the Federal Government are doing with your taxes and health care options and hold them accountable to your wishes!  If you have questions about this give me a call or set up a special time to discuss this face-to face.