The Blood Pressure Guidelines Dilemma

The American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association recently published blood pressure control guidelines that suggest we should be treating blood pressure in 25 year olds the same way we treat it in 79 year olds and older patients. If you have any cardiovascular disease, or a 10% cardiovascular risk assessment over the next few years, they want your systolic blood pressure to be less than 130. They present excellent data explaining that as the blood pressure elevates above 130, the risk of a heart attack, stroke, vascular disease or kidney disease and, ultimately, death increase. No one is arguing these facts.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) along with the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recognizes this one size fits all in blood pressure control creates many problems. As we age, our arteries become less compliant or elastic. Stiffer arteries are more difficult to assess for blood pressure value. After we have exhausted the lifestyle changes of smoking cessation, weight loss, salt restriction and increased activity to control blood pressure; we are forced to use medications. We try to use low doses of medicines to avoid the adverse effects of the pills that the higher dosages can bring.

These medicines are costly. The more we prescribe the more patients don’t take them due to the cost. The more we prescribe, the more patients forget to take multiple pills on multiple schedules of administration. If we get the patients to take the medication we run into the problem of blood pressure precipitously dropping when patients change positions from supine to sitting to standing. If we are lucky, and the patient is well hydrated, then we may only be dealing with a brief dizzy spell. In other cases, we are left treating the consequences of a fall and injury from the fall. The more we strive to control your blood pressure to the new levels with medications the more we must consider drug interactions with prescription medicines being prescribed for other health problems seen in older Americans.

At this point, experts from the ACP Policy Board and noted hypertensive experts at the University of Chicago have suggested we follow the more liberal guidelines of the ACP individualizing our care based on the patient’s health issues. Personalizing care with individual goals makes sense to me, especially in my chronically ill patients battling blood pressure, weight control, age related orthopedic issues, and age related visual and urological issues plus other problems. We strive to do that in our practice allowing the time for discussion, questions and evaluation at each visit.

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