Office Hours, After Hours Phone Calls, E-Mail Communications

For clarity purposes, my office is open at 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday with staff present. The practice does not close for lunch. The telephone lines are open from 8:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

During normal business hours please call the office phone number rather than my cell phone number. My staff will answer the call and bring it to my attention immediately if it is an emergency, or in-between patients if it is not an emergency. Please know there may be times when a consulting physician or hospital nurse may call the doctor’s cell phone directly during your visit. I recognize this may be an inconvenience and will be as efficient as possible while on the call.

If you call before 8:00 a.m. or after 4:30 p.m. the calls are forwarded to my cell phone number if you choose option #2 when listening to the voice message. There is also an option to leave a message.

When calling my cell phone, I will answer immediately if possible. Otherwise, I will return your call within 30 minutes. If you do not receive a return phone call within 30 minutes please call back. There are areas in hospitals and the community that do not have adequate cell phone service so I may not have received your initial call.

If you are having a medical emergency (e.g., heart attack, stroke, major loss of blood, loss of consciousness, breathing difficulty or intractable pain etc.) call 911 immediately and if possible then notify me.

When feeling ill, sick or there is a change in your condition; please call 561.368.0191 rather than sending an email to inform us of the problem. Email communications do not meet Federal privacy law standards.

If your work hours or personal schedule are such that the normal business hours don’t work for you, please call my office manager, Judi Stanich, so we can make arrangements to accommodate your schedule.

Because I have to visit my hospitalized patients during the early morning, I am typically unable to offer appointments prior to 8:00 a.m.

Although I provide 24×7 direct access, you should use discretion when calling me outside of normal office hours. Generally, after hours calls should be when you have a real health concern or an emergency.

Inflammation and Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

For years, experts have noted that up to 50% of men who have a heart attack do not have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, do not smoke and are active. This has led to an exploration of other causes and risk factors of cardiac and cerebrovascular disease.

In recent years, studies have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in untreated psoriatic arthritis and in severe psoriasis. We can also add atopic eczema to the list of cardiovascular risk factors.

In a publication in the British Medical Journal, investigators noted that patients with severe atopic eczema had a 20% increase risk in stroke, 40 – 50% increase risk of a heart attack, unstable angina, atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular death. There was a 70% increased risk of heart failure. The longer the skin condition remained active the higher their risks.

The study looked at almost 380,000 patients over at least a 5 year period and their outcomes were compared to almost 1.5 million controls without the skin conditions. Data came from a review of medical records and insurance information in the United Kingdom.

It’s clear that severe inflammatory conditions including skin conditions put patients at increased risk. It remains to be seen whether aggressive treatment of the skin conditions with immune modulators and medications to reduce inflammation will reduce the risks?

It will be additionally interesting to see what modalities cardiologists on each side of the Atlantic suggest we should employ for detection and with what frequency? Will it be exercise stress testing or checking coronary artery calcification or even CT coronary artery angiograms? Statins have been used to reduce inflammation by some cardiologists even in patients with reasonable lipid levels? Should we be prescribing statins in men and women with these inflammatory skin and joint conditions but normal lipid patterns?

The correlation of inflammatory situations with increased risk of vascular disease currently raises more questions with few answers at the present time.

Bureaucracy, High-tech and a Day Rounding at the Hospital

We have a new electronic medical health record system at our hospital. It was introduced with what I believe is a short and ineffective training program for physicians followed by a far too short on-location use of experts to help the doctors and nurses learn the new system. It is frankly a pain in the neck to access the computer from outside the hospital due to the multiple layers of security and passwords you must use. It is simpler and less complicated at the hospital but the request for frequent change of the password for security purposes makes remembering the password problematic for me especially when I am sitting in the ER at 2:00 a.m. sleep deprived and wanting to get home.

On an average day the computer adds a minimum of 10 minutes of work per patient seen. We have electronic health records to comply with the massive number of Federal mandates requiring it and; to avoid the financial penalties for not complying. The Feds offered each hospital an 11 million dollar incentive for putting in these systems which made their decision to computerize far simpler.

Recently, when I made rounds and attempted to access the computer, a brand new screen greeted me. On the left-hand side it instructed me to tap my ID badge against the screen for an automatic log in access. On the right-hand side was the traditional log in screen.

I must be fair and admit the hospital did notify staff to stop by the Medical Staff Office to be issued a new ID badge which would provide easy access to the system. Since that office opens at 8:00 a.m., and I am usually there earlier than that, I had not yet picked up my new badge. So I used the right-hand side of the screen and accessed it the traditional way typing in my User ID and current password. A swirling circle appeared and swirled for three minutes. Then another screen appeared for two minutes. By this time I was annoyed and frustrated.  A kind nurse noticed my frustration and told me that when you attempt to log into the new screen the first time, it takes about 10 minutes to be logged onto the system. I sat patiently until finally I was let in.

The delay in access pushed me back 10 minutes.  By the time I finished rounds it was 8:00 a.m. I stopped by the Medical Staff Office on the way to my office and asked for my new ID card. I also asked if I could keep my old ID card as well because over the last 40 years I had become attached to it. We needed that ID card to swipe our way into the parking lot, into the building and onto the elevators and certain hospital floors and units.

I was told I needed to keep my old ID card as my new card was to be used only for computer access. It would not get me into the parking lot or the building or special floors and units. They gave me a fancy new ID card holder that accommodates two ID cards.

That’s the high-tech world’s idea of efficiency and progress – I suppose!