Office Hours, After Hours Phone Calls, E-Mail Communications

For clarity purposes, my office is open at 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday with staff present. The practice does not close for lunch. The telephone lines are open from 8:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

During normal business hours please call the office phone number rather than my cell phone number. My staff will answer the call and bring it to my attention immediately if it is an emergency, or in-between patients if it is not an emergency. Please know there may be times when a consulting physician or hospital nurse may call the doctor’s cell phone directly during your visit. I recognize this may be an inconvenience and will be as efficient as possible while on the call.

If you call before 8:00 a.m. or after 4:30 p.m. the calls are forwarded to my cell phone number if you choose option #2 when listening to the voice message. There is also an option to leave a message.

When calling my cell phone, I will answer immediately if possible. Otherwise, I will return your call within 30 minutes. If you do not receive a return phone call within 30 minutes please call back. There are areas in hospitals and the community that do not have adequate cell phone service so I may not have received your initial call.

If you are having a medical emergency (e.g., heart attack, stroke, major loss of blood, loss of consciousness, breathing difficulty or intractable pain etc.) call 911 immediately and if possible then notify me.

When feeling ill, sick or there is a change in your condition; please call 561.368.0191 rather than sending an email to inform us of the problem. Email communications do not meet Federal privacy law standards.

If your work hours or personal schedule are such that the normal business hours don’t work for you, please call my office manager, Judi Stanich, so we can make arrangements to accommodate your schedule.

Because I have to visit my hospitalized patients during the early morning, I am typically unable to offer appointments prior to 8:00 a.m.

Although I provide 24×7 direct access, you should use discretion when calling me outside of normal office hours. Generally, after hours calls should be when you have a real health concern or an emergency.

Inflammation and Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

For years, experts have noted that up to 50% of men who have a heart attack do not have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, do not smoke and are active. This has led to an exploration of other causes and risk factors of cardiac and cerebrovascular disease.

In recent years, studies have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in untreated psoriatic arthritis and in severe psoriasis. We can also add atopic eczema to the list of cardiovascular risk factors.

In a publication in the British Medical Journal, investigators noted that patients with severe atopic eczema had a 20% increase risk in stroke, 40 – 50% increase risk of a heart attack, unstable angina, atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular death. There was a 70% increased risk of heart failure. The longer the skin condition remained active the higher their risks.

The study looked at almost 380,000 patients over at least a 5 year period and their outcomes were compared to almost 1.5 million controls without the skin conditions. Data came from a review of medical records and insurance information in the United Kingdom.

It’s clear that severe inflammatory conditions including skin conditions put patients at increased risk. It remains to be seen whether aggressive treatment of the skin conditions with immune modulators and medications to reduce inflammation will reduce the risks?

It will be additionally interesting to see what modalities cardiologists on each side of the Atlantic suggest we should employ for detection and with what frequency? Will it be exercise stress testing or checking coronary artery calcification or even CT coronary artery angiograms? Statins have been used to reduce inflammation by some cardiologists even in patients with reasonable lipid levels? Should we be prescribing statins in men and women with these inflammatory skin and joint conditions but normal lipid patterns?

The correlation of inflammatory situations with increased risk of vascular disease currently raises more questions with few answers at the present time.