Environmental Pollution Linked to Decreasing Lifespan and Increased Deaths

Worsening air pollution is killing more people at a younger age. We read on a daily basis about a White House sponsored movement back to the use of coal for fuel. At the same time, rules and regulations designed to keep our air and water clean are being relaxed by Administration appointees to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Instead of protecting the environment so that future generations have clean air to breathe, and water to drink, we see rule after rule put in place to protect our countries environment scraped by officials who cite economic profit and jobs over environmental concerns for future generations. When the discussion gets heated, officials cite the fact that even if we use clean energy, developing countries like China and India and third world nations produce enough environmental pollution to offset our best efforts.  The rhetoric goes back and forth between advocates for developing and exporting clean energy (solar, wind, natural gas and nuclear) versus coal products. But, what do the facts say?

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Open Network directly linked air pollution and its contribution of fine particulate matter to the atmosphere with an increased burden of death from several causes. The researchers followed 4,522,160 military veterans in the USA from 2006 to 2016 and linked their exposure to increased particulate matter or pollution to increased deaths from nine causes including:

  1. Heart Disease
  2. Cerebrovascular Disease
  3. Chronic Kidney Disease
  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  5. Dementia
  6. Type II Diabetes Mellitus
  7. Hypertension
  8. Lung Cancer
  9. Pneumonia

The increased death rate was more noticeable in persons of color living in poor socioeconomic communities. The causes of death were in no way related to accidents.

The concentration of pollutants the study population was exposed to was actually lower than the new relaxed standards the current Environmental Protection Agency has approved. Last month a similar study was presented at a worldwide meeting of the World Health Organization.

The message is quite clear.  Unless we want to see a rising death toll due to air pollution, we need to improve the air quality and ask for more stringent standards. At the same time, the USA needs to support the development of clean fuel and energy sources that we can export to developing countries so that their reliance on coal and polluting sources diminishes.

We need to do what we can to control the issue rather than continuing policies that increase the deaths of our citizens in the name of profits.