Passover and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Passover has never been one of my favorite holidays. As a child with nuclear families still within walking distance the work of changing dishes and silver ware, disposing of the chametz and cooking for 15 or more people made the event not very likeable. The seder’s were long while being conducted in a foreign language (Hebrew).  Even the attraction of having thick sweet red wine as a minor and getting a cash reward for finding the hidden matzo, were not enough to overcome the long tiring nature of the meal and storytelling.

It’s now 2020 and the world is suffering through a plague of its own. The numbers of sick and dying are simply numbing and force you to slow down and remember that each statistic represents a human being. This is someone’s loved one.

With that said my family is following the guidelines of staying home and social distancing. That will mean my grandson, who lives 60 minutes away with my daughter and wonderful son in law, will be having their holiday dinner in their home. They have been distancing for over three weeks now with no trips into the community except to walk the dog and to see her obstetrician.

My daughter lives in the zip code with the most cases in South Florida and she comments constantly that her young affluent neighbors fail to obey most of the restrictions and guidelines announced by the Governor and the Florida Department of Public Health and the CDC. Her sisters in Venice, California and Berkeley Heights, New Jersey will do the same. They are social distancing, staying home sharing their seders’ via Zoom. They will have company with their cousins in Boston, one working in a hospital with the Harvard School of Public Health and Washington, DC at Washington’s Children’s’ Hospital. Their parents from Naperville, Illinois will be in on the computer seder as well. We have no idea how this will turn out but, unlike usual years where I lead the seder service or split it with Uncle Alan, this one will involve assigned roles per Aunt Meryl.

The traditional food will be different as well. The days of me coming home from school and running to my maternal grandmothers’ apartment to see the white fish swimming in her bathtub prior to her making her own gefilte fish are long gone. In recent years, it has been finding the correct Jewish deli that makes its own fresh gefilte fish and chopped liver but even that is on hold due to the coronavirus outbreak.

If there is fish it will come from a jar. Without the chicken to make chicken soup our matzo ball soup will come from a can as well. The matzo will be real. The concord grape Manischewitz wine will be real. The Passover Farfel or a potato nick will be real and there are no dry Passover dessert cakes or macaroons. This year my daughter’ s birthday fell prior to the holiday so we are all spared her complaints that the holiday prevented her from having a “real” birthday cake.

This is not the year for community or restaurant or country club seders. This is the year to stay home, be thankful for your loved one’s health and look forward to better healthier times.

3 Responses

  1. As a patient and citizen, what you should be doing is pestering your state representative, Governor, Congressman, Senator and the President and demanding easy access to testing for COVID-19.

  2. Having been doing that relentlessly at the city, County, State and federal level. unfortunately Rick Scott, Marco Rubio, Ron DeSantis, Mike Caruso and Donald Trump and administrators were asleep at the wheel when this could have been contained in Asia and Europe. I have not spared Emily Slosberg, Ted Deutch, Chuck Schumer ( a middle school classmate of mine), Nancy Pelosi either. Have been all over my hospital medical staff leadership as well. Have been encouraging my family and patients to do the same. I email the Sun Sentinel and Miami Herald , NY Times, WSJ with ideas of mine or others of note daily. In November 2020 I will express my feelings if still alive at the ballot box

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