Can Smartphones & Fitbits Interfere with your Pacemaker or Defibrillator?

The February 8th edition of Medpage Today, an online magazine, published the concerns of cardiologist and electrophysiologist Joshua Greenberg, MD, about the magnet arrays in the new Apple iPhone 12 interfering with the function of pacemakers and defibrillators.

When a patient goes to their doctor, cardiologist, electrophysiologist, etc., and the physician wishes to turn off their pacemaker to look at the heart’s normal electrical activity, they normally place a magnet over the implanted device to deactivate it. The new iPhone 12 apparently uses an array of magnets around a wireless charging coil.

Dr Greenberg used the iPhone 12 to disable a Medtronic ICD. Once he brought the phone over the patients left chest the device deactivated. His findings were published in January in a letter to the editor of the journal Heart Rhythm. “This is a big deal because if the patient were to go into ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation during this time, they would just drop dead without receiving a life-saving shock from the ICD.”

Separately, electrophysiologist M. Eskander, MD tweeted a video showing an iPhone12 shutting off a pacemaker as well as if a magnet had been placed over it. Wristband magnets in Fitbit and Apple iWatches have been reported to deactivate Medtronic ICDs from 0.9” away due to their wristband magnets.

Phil Mar, MD , an electrophysiologist at Saint Louis University School of Medicine agrees that this is a previously unrecognized issue that needs to be dealt with. He suggests patients with implanted pacemakers and ICDs avoid purchasing an iPhone with magnets. He encourages their spouses or bed partners to follow the same advice to prevent deactivation when they roll over and get close. He emphasizes that this was not an issue with earlier model iPhones which didn’t have an array of magnets and was not seen in Apple iWatches without the magnetic wrist bands for charging. He is concerned that any cell phone, wrist band or watch using wireless charging may cause the same deactivation.

The author of the article, Anthony Pearson, MD made the suggestion that patients with pacemakers and ICDs should have their cardiologist or electrophysiologist routinely test their cell phones, Fitbits and iWatches’ effect on their devices at a planned routine visit and certainly immediately after implantation. He reminded us this does not occur in devices that do not have a magnet array which is most cell phones and watches.

There has always been a recommendation that if you have a pacemaker or AICD you use your cellphone in the ear opposite your pacemaker or device pocket and never bring it within six inches of the device.

Blood pressure measurement, its importance in reducing vascular disease & remote patient monitoring

An article published in the prestigious journal Hypertension looked at following blood pressure over a decade and the reduction in heart attacks, strokes and deaths if you were able to keep blood pressure under control. It talked about extending your life by over four years and the preventing vascular disease from developing for at least five years.

The authors looked at multiple blood pressure trials and noted the difficulty in relying on one office visit measurement periodically. They too noticed that certain patients were always higher in the office than at home and noted the problems with home blood pressure monitors including trying to decide if they were accurate and being recorded correctly. The result was that whatever reading they obtained at your visit, when looked at over a 10-year period, influenced your survival and cardiac events.

We too have struggled with this issue in our office. We ask patients to bring in their home blood pressure equipment so we can correlate the readings they get in our office on our equipment and their equipment. Just last night a patient with no symptoms and feeling well took his blood pressure and found it elevated. Rather than contact me or his cardiologist he ran to the Emergency Room. He waited hours, had multiple tests and by that time his blood pressure lowered they referred him to his doctors without intervening at all.

When needed, we have a patient use a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor. They wear it on their arm like a blood pressure cuff and it inflates six times per hour during daytime and four times per hour during sleep while measuring their pressure. There is a small recording device worn on their belt. After 24 hours, it is returned to our office and we print out the readings and obtain averages to help us determine just what your blood pressure really is. The equipment has a diary so the patient can note when stressful events occur and we can correlate it with the readings. The minor drawbacks to the equipment are its bulkiness, the need to keep it dry and the disturbance to sleep it causes as the cuff inflates and deflates.

To improve measurements, as well as capture other health metrics, we are introducing a remote monitoring smart wristband. We have identified a vendor who will supply you with the high-tech wrist band at no out-of-pocket expense to you. The wristband interacts with your iPhone or android phone.

The device measures and captures pulse, heart rhythm, blood pressure, blood oxygen level, and steps.  It even has built-in fall detection. The 2021 model, which will be introduced in a few months, has an EKG component to help us follow patients who get dizzy, faint or have documented heart issues. It will also capture body temperature. There is an optional blood glucose sensor monitoring device. The wristband is water resistant so you may shower with it.

Due to the Pandemic, and development of tele-health, Medicare pays for the monitoring if you wear the device a minimum of 16 days each month. Patients are asked to identify emergency contacts so that if you fall or if you have an arrhythmia, abnormal blood pressure, abnormal blood sugar, the monitoring call center contacts your emergency contact on record.

Your physician can view all the data on our computers. Certain private insurances pay for these services as well as Medicare. I will start wearing one and my wife will as well.

I will personally discuss this with each of you whom I feel will benefit from wearing the wristband as remote monitoring is proven to reduce hospital admissions and ER visits. If you have a chronic condition, disease or certain risk factors; it’s likely I will encourage you to wear the band.

Some patients have asked if the band has a panic button for you to push if you feel you need to such as after a fall. The technology senses if you fell and have not gotten up or if you are ill and calls your emergency contacts but it does not have a unique panic button to push.

We look forward to introducing this new remote high technology to improve your health, safety and peace of mind.

New Oral Testosterone Replacement Treatment is on the Horizon

We see a many men who develop testosterone deficiency. Testosterone is a hormone produced in both men and women which plays a tremendous part in our lean muscle mass, our sexuality and our energy levels. It is secreted into the blood and peaks between 8:00 – 10:00 each morning.

To determine whether you have a testosterone deficiency, your blood must be drawn during those hours for accuracy. If two tests show your level below 280 you may benefit from replacement therapy.

To replace testosterone we currently have had only three options. One option is by placing a gel preparation on your skin and allowing it to be absorbed each day. One preparation comes in a gel in a tube and you measure out a particular dosage and administer it to your skin. Another preparation comes in pre-measured transdermal patches which you apply to your skin.

Both skin applications are easy to use and are less likely to cause the adverse effects testosterone is sometimes associated with such as an increased blood thickness or secondary polycythemia. The drawback to these preparations is they cost anywhere from $500 to $1,000 per month. The only less expensive alternative has been the injectable testosterone cypionate which costs about $80 per month and requires an injection into your muscle every two weeks.

The injectable form, while far more affordable, results in more adverse events than the transdermal form. We usually prescribe the lowest dosage possible and then, seven days after your shot, measure your testosterone level with a blood test at any time of the day. Based on the results, we adjust the future dosage.

Marius Pharmaceutical submitted a new drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for an oral form of testosterone undeanoate taken in a gel capsule twice per day. It will be marketed under the name Kyzatrex.

In their initial studies, looking at six months of data, they were able to achieve average expected testosterone levels in 96% of the men who completed the 90-day treatment study. High blood pressure was the only true adverse effect reported. No mention was made of what a month’s supply will cost if the FDA approves the drug for use in primary and secondary testosterone deficiency.

PreDiabetes in The Elderly – Not to Worry

As physicians and educated adults we realize that developing diabetes increases our risks of heart disease, narrowing of our arteries or vascular disease, injury to the retina of our eyes leading to poor low vision or blindness, peripheral neuropathy or burning pains in our feet and elsewhere. We additionally have been taught the correlation between controlling our blood sugars and trying to reduce the risk of developing these complications.

In my early years in practice if a patient came in for fasting bloodwork and their glucose level was elevated above 110 on two occasions they met the legal definition of diabetes. Patients always had an excuse. “It was my birthday so I had cupcakes at work, cake and mixed alcoholic drinks at home, etc.” There were always rational reasons for being a human being, enjoying life and not being a disciplined diabetic patient.

The development of the hemoglobin A1c eliminated those excuses. It recognized that the higher your daily average blood sugar the more sugar would bind with a hemoglobin molecule and increase your hemoglobin A1C. That has given us a measure of your average blood sugar over the previous 90-days. Normal values were established as well as values in the diabetic range. The intermediate values were labeled “pre-diabetes”.

The question became “How do you keep “pre-diabetics” from becoming diabetics and risking all those complications.” Did the same rules apply to middle aged adults as to the elderly?

For the most part I counseled pre-diabetics that they had an increased risk of developing diabetes but if they stayed active, kept their weight down and improved their dietary choices they would be fine.

A research paper in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) online edition now supports that position. Mary Rooney, PhD of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, published her data looking at 3,142 individuals 70 -90 years old with 44% being diagnosed with prediabetes. They were followed for six years.

During that time-period, only 9% of them went on to become diabetic. Thirteen percent (13%) improved into the normal glycemic range. Nineteen percent (19%) died of other causes.

The message is clear. If you are 70 years of age or older, and your hemoglobin A1C moves into the 5.7 or greater range, you are considered pre-diabetic. Stay fit and active. Keep your weight down. Meet with a dietitian and learn how to eat well and healthy, stop smoking and go for regular checkups. Diabetes will not do you in!

The “Fat but Fit” Paradox

The Reznick family has always struggled with weight issues. We enjoy eating large portions, snacking and having our wine and spirits in moderation.

I remember accompanying my dad to his checkup in my teenage years. His internist was a highly respected chief of the internal medicine department at a large NY academic teaching facility as well as a long-time family friend. I remember the conversation well. Dr. Cohen would say, “Lou you are too heavy and I don’t want you to get sick from it!” Dad would respond with,” Ted I am not too fat I am just too short.! I am really fit working on the loading docks at my business and running around on my feet all day.”

Here we are 60 years later and the “fat but fit“ paradox has been examined in the journal Preventive Cardiology where researchers looked at 527,662 adults aged 18-64 years. This was performed by reviewing insurance information of patients who underwent regular health checkups through an occupational risk- prevention company.

They divided the group into normal weight, overweight and obese. They then separated them by activity levels with some being inactive (64%), insufficiently active (12%) and regularly active (24%). Of the study group, 30% had elevated cholesterol, 15% had high blood pressure and 3% had diabetes.

The study showed that those who were physically active reduced their cardiovascular risk. The overweight and obese individuals who were active were never ever able to reduce their cardiovascular risk to the level of a normal weight active individual of similar age. Overweight individuals are still more likely to develop hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes due to insulin resistance in lipid rich cells.

The goal for physicians is to help you to live longer with a high-quality life. To accomplish this, we still need to emphasize achieving a normal body mass index or weight, maintaining a healthy active lifestyle and controlling those health issues that still develop in fit active adults.

Weight control and regular check-ups with your physician remain extremely important!