New Oral Testosterone Replacement Treatment is on the Horizon

We see a many men who develop testosterone deficiency. Testosterone is a hormone produced in both men and women which plays a tremendous part in our lean muscle mass, our sexuality and our energy levels. It is secreted into the blood and peaks between 8:00 – 10:00 each morning.

To determine whether you have a testosterone deficiency, your blood must be drawn during those hours for accuracy. If two tests show your level below 280 you may benefit from replacement therapy.

To replace testosterone we currently have had only three options. One option is by placing a gel preparation on your skin and allowing it to be absorbed each day. One preparation comes in a gel in a tube and you measure out a particular dosage and administer it to your skin. Another preparation comes in pre-measured transdermal patches which you apply to your skin.

Both skin applications are easy to use and are less likely to cause the adverse effects testosterone is sometimes associated with such as an increased blood thickness or secondary polycythemia. The drawback to these preparations is they cost anywhere from $500 to $1,000 per month. The only less expensive alternative has been the injectable testosterone cypionate which costs about $80 per month and requires an injection into your muscle every two weeks.

The injectable form, while far more affordable, results in more adverse events than the transdermal form. We usually prescribe the lowest dosage possible and then, seven days after your shot, measure your testosterone level with a blood test at any time of the day. Based on the results, we adjust the future dosage.

Marius Pharmaceutical submitted a new drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for an oral form of testosterone undeanoate taken in a gel capsule twice per day. It will be marketed under the name Kyzatrex.

In their initial studies, looking at six months of data, they were able to achieve average expected testosterone levels in 96% of the men who completed the 90-day treatment study. High blood pressure was the only true adverse effect reported. No mention was made of what a month’s supply will cost if the FDA approves the drug for use in primary and secondary testosterone deficiency.