Can Smartphones & Fitbits Interfere with your Pacemaker or Defibrillator?

The February 8th edition of Medpage Today, an online magazine, published the concerns of cardiologist and electrophysiologist Joshua Greenberg, MD, about the magnet arrays in the new Apple iPhone 12 interfering with the function of pacemakers and defibrillators.

When a patient goes to their doctor, cardiologist, electrophysiologist, etc., and the physician wishes to turn off their pacemaker to look at the heart’s normal electrical activity, they normally place a magnet over the implanted device to deactivate it. The new iPhone 12 apparently uses an array of magnets around a wireless charging coil.

Dr Greenberg used the iPhone 12 to disable a Medtronic ICD. Once he brought the phone over the patients left chest the device deactivated. His findings were published in January in a letter to the editor of the journal Heart Rhythm. “This is a big deal because if the patient were to go into ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation during this time, they would just drop dead without receiving a life-saving shock from the ICD.”

Separately, electrophysiologist M. Eskander, MD tweeted a video showing an iPhone12 shutting off a pacemaker as well as if a magnet had been placed over it. Wristband magnets in Fitbit and Apple iWatches have been reported to deactivate Medtronic ICDs from 0.9” away due to their wristband magnets.

Phil Mar, MD , an electrophysiologist at Saint Louis University School of Medicine agrees that this is a previously unrecognized issue that needs to be dealt with. He suggests patients with implanted pacemakers and ICDs avoid purchasing an iPhone with magnets. He encourages their spouses or bed partners to follow the same advice to prevent deactivation when they roll over and get close. He emphasizes that this was not an issue with earlier model iPhones which didn’t have an array of magnets and was not seen in Apple iWatches without the magnetic wrist bands for charging. He is concerned that any cell phone, wrist band or watch using wireless charging may cause the same deactivation.

The author of the article, Anthony Pearson, MD made the suggestion that patients with pacemakers and ICDs should have their cardiologist or electrophysiologist routinely test their cell phones, Fitbits and iWatches’ effect on their devices at a planned routine visit and certainly immediately after implantation. He reminded us this does not occur in devices that do not have a magnet array which is most cell phones and watches.

There has always been a recommendation that if you have a pacemaker or AICD you use your cellphone in the ear opposite your pacemaker or device pocket and never bring it within six inches of the device.

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