Sugary Drinks & Increased Colon Cancer

The Nurses Health Study II followed 95,464 nurses’ health from 1991- 2015. Principal researcher Yin Cao, ScD, MPH, of Washington University in St. Louis and co-researchers found that those women consuming two sugar sweetened beverages a day in adulthood had more than double the early onset colorectal cancer risk as those consuming less than one serving a week. The risk rose by 16% with each additional serving per day.

In adolescents aged 13-18, each serving per day increment was accompanied by a 32 % higher risk of early onset colorectal cancer. As adolescents reach adulthood, replacing these sugar sweetened beverages with artificially sweetened beverages, coffee or milk was associated with a 17-36% lower risk.

The diagnosis of colorectal cancer in those born around 1990, and risk of developing it, is twice as much risk of developing colon cancer and four times the risk of developing rectal cancer as in adults born around 1950. Cao and associates offered several theoretical reasons for the findings including the use of fructose corn syrup as a sweetener instead of real sugar. Fructose corn syrup is known to make changes to the intestinal wall making it more susceptible to carcinogens. And, it has been shown to cause intestinal tumors in mice.

The message is clear. Obstetricians, family practitioners, pediatricians and internists need to start asking about sugar sweetened beverages in our patient histories. Screening for colon and rectal cancer at a younger age with fecal globulin tests, Cologuard fecal genetic testing and fiber optic exams in a younger group is essential. Most importantly, we must educate teenagers and young adults about the dangers of these sugar sweetened beverages so they don’t give them to their friends and eventually their own children.