Aerobic Training Helps Blood Pressure Medications Do Their Job

We are always looking for ways to stay healthy with less medicine.  Miguel Ramirez-Jiminez, PhD of the  University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain presented a paper to the American College of Sports Medicine recently week and addressed this topic.

His group looked at 36 obese and overweight adults who normally did less than 120-minutes of physical activity per week. Ages ranged from 53 – 65 years with 22% postmenopausal women. They had all been taking blood pressure medications for at least eight years and all met the criteria for having the metabolic syndrome which includes hypertension, elevated blood glucose, elevated triglycerides and a large waist.

The group was randomly divided into a placebo group whose medication was stopped or a trial group who continued their antihypertensive medications for the next three days. All participants then underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. All the participants were then entered into a four-month cycling program three times a week. 

After completing the four months of cycling training the placebo group again did not receive their medications for three days while the trial group did.  Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure was then checked in both groups.

The group exercising plus taking their medications saw an average drop in blood pressure of 3-5 mm Hg in addition to the 5mm Hg noted just from the medication’s pre-exercise training. When the exercise program stopped, the extra drop in blood pressure additionally dropped. There is a phenomenon known as “post exercise hypotension” that can reduce your blood pressure for up to 24 hours after training. This is the reason experts advise 3-5 exercise sessions per week.  

The study also revealed that if you exercise aggressively, and hope to permanently stop your blood pressure medications, your pressure usually rises above acceptable levels.  Exercise is not a substitute for prescribed blood pressure medicines. The article can be found at www.medscape.com  

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