Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux with Magnet Device

Gastroesophageal reflux disease causes heartburn and regurgitation of food and digestive enzymes. Treatment includes weight loss, wearing loose clothing not binding at the waste, dietary restriction and medications. The main class of medications used have been the protein pump inhibitors (PPI’s) such as Nexium, Protonix, Aciphex and Pepcid. Most recently this class of medications has come under major criticism from researchers believing they may be responsible for increased risk of community acquired pneumonia, malabsorption of nutrients resulting in bone disease and even dementia and cognitive decline. Physicians have been trying to limit the use of these medications but recurrent and persistent symptoms have made that very difficult.

Last month at Digestive Disease Week, a meeting sponsored by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, The American Gastroenterological Association, The American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract; a paper was presented demonstrating the success of a magnetic band placed with laparoscopic surgery around the lower esophageal sphincter (the juncture of the esophagus and stomach).

Reginald Bell, MD of the SurgOne Foregut Institute in Denver, Colorado along with MedPage reported that at six months post procedure, 92.6% of the patients with the magnetic device LINX, had relief of regurgitant symptoms compared with 8.6 % taking a double dose of PPI’s. Only one surgical complication had occurred and it was corrected. The research was done at 22 different locations enrolling 150 patients with moderate to severe regurgitation despite once-daily use of a PPI treatment.

The improvement numbers are dramatic and if this stands over time will change the way we treat this disease. The publication did not reveal the cost of LINX and we certainly want to observe these patients for more than six months before endorsing a new and promising treatment.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Responds To Rifaximin

Abdomin v2In a study presented at annual meeting of The American College of Gastroenterology, Anthony Lembo, MD, of the Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, presented data that showed that the non-absorbable antibiotic Rifaximin helps control cramping and diarrhea related Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Irritable bowel cripples individuals by causing abdominal cramping and multiple loose or watery stools per day. These patients have been screened by colonoscopy and imaging studies for more serious diseases such as Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis with testing ruling these entities out. They are left with severe symptoms but no objective findings on available tests.

The study was comprised of 2,579 patients who received either Rifaximin or placebo three times per week. The decision to try an antibiotic was based on the theory that some IBS patients have excessive bacteria in the gut causing the problem. The treatment was successful in a significant number of participants compared to placebo based on a reduction of pain and frequency and number of stools. The patients were then observed for four weeks during which time some patients relapsed. If these patients were treated for another two weeks they showed significant improvement.

Irritable bowel incapacitates millions of individuals. While this data is extremely preliminary, it gives us hope of another treatment regimen, becoming available soon, that is effective and safe.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Responds To Rifaximin

StomachIn a study presented at the annual meeting of The American College of Gastroenterology, Anthony Lembo, MD, of the Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center presented data that showed that the non-absorbable antibiotic Rifaximin helps control cramping and diarrhea related Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Irritable bowel cripples individuals by causing abdominal cramping and multiple loose or watery stools per day. These patients have been screened by colonoscopy and imaging studies for more serious diseases such as Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis with testing ruling these entities out. They are left with severe symptoms but no objective findings on available tests.

Over 2,500 patients participated in this study and received either Rifaximin or placebo three times per week. The decision to try an antibiotic was based on the theory that some IBS patients have excessive bacteria in the gut causing the problem. The treatment was successful in a significant number of participants compared to placebo based on a reduction of pain and frequency and number of stools. The patients were then observed for four (4) weeks during which time some patients relapsed. If these patients were treated for another two (2) weeks they showed significant improvement.

Irritable bowel incapacitates millions of individuals. While this data is extremely preliminary, it gives us hope of another treatment regimen, becoming available soon, that is effective and safe.