Allergies Worsening Due to Climate Change

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the World Asthma Organization just concluded their joint congress in Orlando, Florida. One of the topics of concern is how climate change is making everyone’s allergy symptoms much worse.

We read about more powerful hurricanes and cyclones, seasonal tornadoes occurring out of season, horrible beach erosion and flooding due to large volume rains, lack of rain causing poor harvests leading to waves of migration for survival for animals and humans. Climate change also exacerbates allergy symptoms. Nelson A. Rosario, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics at Federal University of Parana (Brazil) discussed longer pollen season and increased allergens caused by fallen trees and ripped up plants, mold growing following flooding and irritants in the air due to wildfires. An international survey in 2015 found that 80% of rhinitis patients blamed their symptom exacerbations on climate change items. Pollen seasons have more than doubled in some areas.

The argument should not be about whether climate change is due to cyclical planetary changes or man-made pollutants. It should be about what we can do as a society to maintain economic growth while limiting man made contribution to adverse climate changes. The health and survival consequences of not addressing this issue will ultimately involve our survival as a species.

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Does Curcumin Use Help with Cognitive Dysfunction?

Recently, more and more patients have been adding curcumin or turmeric to their cooking to help with their memory. Curcumin is a metabolite of Turmeric and has been available in health food stores for years.

A study a few years back on Alzheimer’s patients published by J. Ringman and Associates showed no benefit in slowing the development of symptoms and no improvement in symptoms when supplied with curcumin. When they looked closely at their study, and analyzed the participant’s blood, they found that curcumin was not absorbed and never really entered the bloodstream.

Last month a study was published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry by Dr. Gary Small and colleagues. They looked at 40 patients with mild memory complaints aged 50 – 90.  Some were administered a placebo and others were administered nanoparticles of curcumin in a product called “Theracumin”. The participants were randomized and blinded to the product they were testing. The study designers felt the nanoparticles would be absorbed better than other products and would actually test whether this substance was helpful or not. At 18 months, memory improved in patients taking the nanoparticles of curcumin and they had less amyloid deposition in areas it usually found relating to Alzheimers Disease.

Robert Isaacson MD, the director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weil Cornell Medicine and New York- Presbyterian, has been suggesting his patients cook with curcumin for years. Until the development of the Theracumin nanoparticles, cooking with curcumin was the best way to have it absorbed after ingestion. There is now some evidence to suggest that curcumin, in this specific nanoparticle form, may play a role in both the risk reduction and potential therapeutic management of Alzheimers Disease.

Can My Relative, the Physician, Review My Hospital Chart?

I practice in a community, Boca Raton, with a multitude of seasonal visitors. Many of these “snowbirds” have long term relationships with physicians “back home” and a developing relationship with their local physicians. When they become ill enough to be admitted to the hospital, I often get a request to allow a family member to review their medical chart. I have never objected to transparency, especially if it allows the patient and family to feel more comfortable with the caregivers and plan we are following.

When we used a paper chart the process was simple and involved writing an order in the chart to allow that family member to read the chart. I usually spoke with the patient’s nurse and the floor charge nurse to inform them of my permission. The family member simply sat in the patient room or at the nursing station with the complete medical record and reviewed it.

The switch to paperless charts has made it far more complicated. Giving patients’ relatives access to the chart now involves granting them access to the hospital computer record system. It now involves asking medical records to get involved and either devote time and cost of supplies (printing out records) or labor time – asking an employee to sit down with the family member and give them access. It is far more difficult than it once was.

I still grant them access but it must be through the hospital’s information technology and medical records department and protocol. This week I was asked by the physician son of a patient for permission to review his parent’s chart. I had no objection to this request as long as the son went through the medical records department protocol. This was poorly received by the son who saw my actions as an obstruction rather than a necessary process.

If anyone should be understanding regarding these protocols it should be that of a fellow physician.

More on Shingrix, the Shingles Vaccine

Recently, the FDA approved a new shingles vaccine called Shingrix. It is a two shot series with the suggestion made that the second shot should be taken 2 – 6 months after the first one. Shingrix will replace the original shingles vaccine Zostavax. Shingrix is recommended in all patients over 50 years old.

For those of you who have had the original shot, Zostavax, the new vaccine is still recommended. It is covered by Medicare Part D which means you must take it in a pharmacy or walk in center not in your doctor’s office. While this makes NO sense, it is the rule. If you have had shingles it is still recommended you take the new vaccine (Shingrix).

Shingles is a skin rash and painful skin condition caused by the chicken pox virus Varicella. When you have chicken pox and complete the infection course you are immune but the virus remains alive forever, living in sensory nerve endings along the spinal cord. One third of adults will have an outbreak of this varicella virus which will appear along the path of a sensory nerve or dermatome on one side of your body. It will go through the full cycle of rash, pustule and then scab that the chicken pox did. A significant number of patients will continue to have pain over the involved skin for prolonged time periods in what we call post herpetic neuralgia. The pain is described as severe as an eye scrape, passing a kidney stone or going through labor and delivery.

The original shingles vaccine, Zostavax, protected against the rash 51% of the time and against post herpetic neuralgia 67% of the time. This efficacy dropped to about 30% after four years. The new vaccine, Shingrix protects against the rash over 90% of the time and against the pain syndrome 85-90% of the time while lasting for more than four years.

Only five percent (5%) of patients receiving Shingrix develop side effects. The most common are fever, myalgia and chills. In view of this, I am suggesting to my patients we allow the vaccine to be on the U.S. market for a year to see the adverse event profile and, if safe, we then start the series of shots.

Cigar and Pipe Smoking Significantly Increases Mortality Risk

My male patients express to me on a regular basis their desire to continue to smoke a few cigars per day. They are quick to point out that they do not inhale the smoke like cigarette smokers do. They also point out that their use of cigars is far fewer in number than cigarettes. They all discount the risks of the smoke, its byproducts, carbon monoxide, etc.

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has just published a research project which looked at that subject. They followed cigar and pipe smokers from 1985 until 2011 looking at the mortality rate and the cancers they sustained. Of the 357,420 participants in the study, 51,150 died. The death rate of cigar and pipe smokers was much higher than nonsmokers and those who never smoked. There was also a much higher likelihood they would sustain a tobacco related cancer such as lung, throat, esophagus, oral cavity and bladder cancer which would eventually kill them.

It was clear the risks were higher for cigarette smokers than pipe and cigar smokers. As a physician, I will continue to encourage smoking cessation of all tobacco products.

Tobacco smoking ruins your health and kills people. Let there be no confusion about that fact.

The Blood Pressure Guidelines Dilemma

The American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association recently published blood pressure control guidelines that suggest we should be treating blood pressure in 25 year olds the same way we treat it in 79 year olds and older patients. If you have any cardiovascular disease, or a 10% cardiovascular risk assessment over the next few years, they want your systolic blood pressure to be less than 130. They present excellent data explaining that as the blood pressure elevates above 130, the risk of a heart attack, stroke, vascular disease or kidney disease and, ultimately, death increase. No one is arguing these facts.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) along with the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recognizes this one size fits all in blood pressure control creates many problems. As we age, our arteries become less compliant or elastic. Stiffer arteries are more difficult to assess for blood pressure value. After we have exhausted the lifestyle changes of smoking cessation, weight loss, salt restriction and increased activity to control blood pressure; we are forced to use medications. We try to use low doses of medicines to avoid the adverse effects of the pills that the higher dosages can bring.

These medicines are costly. The more we prescribe the more patients don’t take them due to the cost. The more we prescribe, the more patients forget to take multiple pills on multiple schedules of administration. If we get the patients to take the medication we run into the problem of blood pressure precipitously dropping when patients change positions from supine to sitting to standing. If we are lucky, and the patient is well hydrated, then we may only be dealing with a brief dizzy spell. In other cases, we are left treating the consequences of a fall and injury from the fall. The more we strive to control your blood pressure to the new levels with medications the more we must consider drug interactions with prescription medicines being prescribed for other health problems seen in older Americans.

At this point, experts from the ACP Policy Board and noted hypertensive experts at the University of Chicago have suggested we follow the more liberal guidelines of the ACP individualizing our care based on the patient’s health issues. Personalizing care with individual goals makes sense to me, especially in my chronically ill patients battling blood pressure, weight control, age related orthopedic issues, and age related visual and urological issues plus other problems. We strive to do that in our practice allowing the time for discussion, questions and evaluation at each visit.

Emergencies and the Rational For Our Treatment Algorithm

We are a primary care medical office that tries to deliver personalized attentive care. We define emergencies as chest pain, significant breathing difficulty and loss of consciousness, uncontrolled bleeding or pain, sudden change in mental status and behavior or major trauma. In these situations, my office staff receiving a phone call interrupts me so I can speak with you and determine whether or not to advise you to call 911. We do this because we know with life threatening situations time is of the essence.

Emergency Medical Services at 911 can arrive within 5 minutes. They are all Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) trained and carry the equipment and medications to provide life sustaining care while you are transported to a hospital Emergency Department that has the staff, medications and equipment to keep you alive while we diagnose the problem and create a plan to rectify it.

The office staff is trained in Basic Cardiac Life Support. We do not have a defibrillator. We do not maintain and store medications to correct low blood pressure – cardiac arrhythmias. We do not have endotracheal tubes to intubate you and breathe for you. In the past, when we tried to maintain these supplies, they became outdated due to infrequent use and were expensive to replace. Since we do very few resuscitations day to day we are not as experienced or efficient as EMS and emergency department personnel are.

I realize the wait for care and institutional care settings are not pleasant. We sacrifice that for the best chance to keep you healthy. Trust me, it is no fun cancelling a scheduled patients to run to the ER and then return already behind. We do it for your comfort and security and safety.

In the recent past patients with chest pain resembling heart disease, trouble breathing and excessive bleeding have refused to call 911 and were upset when we did not bring them into the office. We do this for your health and safety not our convenience. If you would like to discuss this feel free to contact the office.