Chocolate as a Cough Suppressant

Well before Valentine’s Day, and conspicuously in the middle of cold and flu season, Alyn Morice of the University of Hull in Yorkshire, England published a study showing that dark chocolate derivatives may be more effective than codeine in suppressing a cough. In a small study of 163 individuals, each with a cough due to an infection, her group randomly assigned them to a group receiving a codeine based cough syrup or a chocolate cocoa based syrup called Rococo. Their results showed that within two days the chocolate based recipients felt significant improvement in their cough compared to the codeine based group. A similar study had previously been performed at the imperial College in London showing that theobromine, a product in cocoa, is superior to suppressing coughs over codeine.

Professor Morice believes the properties in cocoa are demulcent and help relieve irritation and inflammation. “This simply means it is stickier and more viscous than standard cough medicines, so it forms a coating which protects nerve endings in the throat which trigger the urge to cough. This demulcent effect explains why honey and lemon and other sugary syrups help.” They believe chocolate has additional helpful ingredients so much so that they advise sucking on a piece of dark chocolate as a mechanism of relieving a cough. We now have some science to back mom’s hot chocolate and hot cocoa for a cold and a cough.

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Winter is the Season for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Influenza

It’s the season for winter viral upper respiratory tract system infections. It is also influenza and influenza- like illness season.

Winter brings crowds of people indoors together and holiday travel places crowds together in indoor areas as well. These viral illnesses are transmissible by hand to mouth transmission and airborne particle transmission with coughing. The viral particles can live with minimal water on surfaces for long enough periods of time to infect patients who unknowingly touch a foreign surface and bring their hands up to their mouths. Hand washing frequently is an essential part of preventing the transmission of these diseases. Common courtesy such as covering your mouth when you sneeze or cough and not coming in close contact with others when ill is essential.

Research has shown that consuming an extra 500 mg a day of Vitamin C can prevent colds and reduce the intensity of a cold if you catch one. You must take the Vitamin C all the time and in advance of exposure. Waiting until you have symptoms has no positive effect. Viral upper respiratory tract infections usually include fatigue, runny nose (coryza), sore throat (less than 90 % of adult sore throats are not a strep throat).

If you have been around a sick child age 2-7 who has a fever, swollen neck glands and an exudative sore throat your chances of having a strep throat are increased. Fever is usually low grade, less than 101, and short lived. Very often patients develop viral inflammation of the conjunctiva or conjunctivitis. While this is very contagious to others, it is self-limited and rarely requires intervention or treatment.

Caring for a cold involves listening to your body and practicing common sense solutions. Rest if tired. Don’t go to the gym and workout if you feel ill. If you insist on going, warm up slowly and thoroughly and, if you do not feel well, stop the workout.

Sore throat can be treated with lozenges. Warm fluids including tea and honey (honey is antimicrobial and anti-viral), chicken soup, saline nasal spray for congestion and acetaminophen for aches and pains or fever are mainstays of treatment. Over the counter cough medications like guaifenisin help.

Some of the viruses affect your gastrointestinal tract causing cramps and diarrhea. Nausea and vomiting are sometimes present as well. The key is to put your bowel to rest, stay hydrated and avoid contaminating or infecting others. Clear liquids, ice chips, shaved ices, Italian ices or juice pops will keep you hydrated. A whiff of an alcohol swab will relieve the nausea as well. If you are having trouble keeping food or fluids down call your doctor. If you are taking prescription medications, call your doctor and see which ones, if any, you can take a drug holiday from until you are better.

Influenza is more severe. It is almost always accompanied by fever and aches and pains. Prevention involves taking a seasonal flu shot. Flu shots are effective in keeping individuals out of the hospital from complications of influenza. They are not perfect but far better than no prevention. If you run a fever of 100.8 or higher, and ache all over, call your physician. An influenza nasal swab can confirm influenza A and B 70 % of the time.

The new molecular test which can provide results in under an hour is far more accurate but not available at most urgent care or walk in centers or physician offices. Immediate treatment with Osetamivir (Tamiflu) and the newer Peramivir are effective at reducing the duration and intensity of the infection if started early. Hydration with clear fluids, rest, acetaminophen or anti-inflammatories for fever in adults 101 or greater and rest is the mainstay of treatment. Prolonged fever or respiratory distress requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor immediately.

I get asked frequently for a way to speed up the healing. “My children are coming down to visit. We have a cruise planned. I am flying in 48 hours on business.”  I am certainly sympathetic but these illnesses need to run their course. They are not interested in our personal or professional schedule and everyone you come in contact with is a potential new victim. If you are congested in the nose or throat, and or sinuses, then travelling by plane is putting you at risk of severe pain and damage to your ear drum. See your doctor first. Patients and pilots with nasal congestion are advised not to fly for seven to ten days for just this reason.

If you have multiple chronic illnesses including heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease and you run a fever or feel miserable then call your doctor and make arrangements to be seen. It will not necessarily speed up the healing but it will identify who actually requires antibiotics and additional follow up and tests and who can let nature take its course.

Cold and Flu Season Coming

As we head into fall and winter we see an increase in the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the community. Most of these are simple self-limited infections that healthy individuals can weather after a period of a few days to a week of being uncomfortable from runny noses, sinus congestion, sore throats, coughs, aches and pains and sometimes fever. There are studies out of Scandinavia conducted in extreme cold temperature environments that show that taking an extra gram of Vitamin C per day reduces the number of these infections and the severity and duration in elite athletes and Special Forces military troops. Starting extra vitamin C once you develop symptoms does little to shorten the duration or lessen the intensity of the illness. Vigorous hand washing and avoidance of sick individuals helps as well. Flu shots prevent viral influenza and should be taken by all adults unless they have a specific contraindication to influenza. A cold is not the flu or influenza. Whooping cough or pertussis vaccination with TDap should be taken by all middle aged and senior adults as well to update their pertussis immunity. We often see pictures of individuals wearing cloth surgical masks in crowded areas to prevent being exposed to a viral illness. Those cloth surgical masks keep the wearers secretions and “germs” contained from others but do nothing to prevent infectious agents others are emitting from getting through the pores of the mask and infecting them. If you wish to wear a mask that is effective in keeping infectious agents out then you need to be using an N95 respirator mask.

Once you exhibit viral upper respiratory tract symptoms care is supportive. If you are a running a fever of 101 degrees or higher taking Tylenol or a NSAID will bring the fever down. Staying hydrated with warm fluids, soups and broths helps. Resting when tired helps. Most adults do not “catch” strep throat unless they are exposed to young children usually ages 2-7 that have strep throat. Sore throats feel better with warm fluids, throat lozenges and rest.

You need to see your doctor if you have a chronic illness such as asthma , COPD, heart failure or an immunosuppressive disease which impairs your immune system and you develop a viral illness with a fever of 100.8 or higher. If your fever is 101 or greater for more than 24 hours it is the time to contact your doctor. Breathing difficulty is a red flag for the need to contact your physician immediately.

Most of these viral illnesses will make you feel miserable but will resolve on their own with rest, common sense and plenty of fluids.

Adult Sore Throats 2015 – 2016 Flu Season

Robert Centor, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, performed the definitive study on adult sore throats showing that 10% or less of adult sore throats are caused by bacteria particularly Group A Streptococcus . He went on to prove that bacterial Strep throats were accompanied by a cough, large swollen and tender lymph nodes, a temperature greater than 100.4 and an exudate on your tonsils. The disease is primarily seen in children age 2-7 and those who care for them and play with them. In adults who did not meet the criteria of having a cough, swollen and enlarged lymph nodes, a temperature of 100.4 and a tonsillar exudate, a rapid streptococcus throat swab was accurate 100 % of the time. If the quick strep analysis is negative you do not have a strep throat and do not require an antibiotic. We had two patients this past fall who did not meet the criteria of Dr. Centor, did not have the physical findings consistent with a strep throat, had a negative quick strep throat swab but upon performing a traditional throat culture were found to be positive for Group a Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus requiring antibiotics. Why did the discrepancy occur? According to the manufacturer they had to recall a batch of diagnostic material that was ineffective. Both patients were placed on antibiotics soon after their clinical course did not follow the path of a viral infection and both did well.

Most adult sore throats and colds do not require antibiotics. We reserve them for patient with debilitating chronic illnesses especially advanced pulmonary, cardiac and neurologic disease patients. With influenza season on the horizon we will continue to assess patient’s clinically using history, exam, quick strep throat swabs and traditional microbiological throat cultures where appropriate. I will continue to prescribe antibiotics where necessary but must admit, last years’ experience opened my eyes to a more liberal approach with the prescribing of antibiotics for simple sore throats.

Is that Z Pack for the Cough Safe? Do Antibiotics Trigger Arrhythmias?

Azithromycin“Hello Dr Reznick, this is JP, I have a runny nose, a cough productive of yellowish green phlegm, a scratchy throat and I ache all over. My northern doctor always gives me a Z Pack or levaquin or Cipro when I get this. I know my body well and I need an antibiotic. Saul and I are scheduled to go see the children and grandchildren next week and I want to knock this out of my system. Can you just call in a Z-Pack? I don’t have time to come in for a visit.”

This is a common phone call at my internal medicine practice. Despite the Center for Disease Control and the American Academy of Infectious Disease Physicians running an education al campaign on the correct use of antibiotics, patients still want what they want , when they want it. The Annals of Family Medicine , March/April issue contained a study by G. Rao, M.D., PhD of the University of South Carolina in Columbia which examined whether a Z Pack (azithromycin) or a fluroquinolone (levaquin) can cause arrhythmias and an increased risk of death. Their study was a result of a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine that proved that macrolide antibiotics were associated with a higher cardiovascular death risk and rate than penicillin type antibiotics such as amoxicillin. To examine this issue closely, Rao and associates examined data from U.S. veterans who received outpatient treatment with amoxicillin (979,380 patients), azithromycin (Z Pack 594,792 patients) and levofloxacin (levaquin 201,798 patients). These were patients in the VA health system between 1999 and April 2012. Their average age was 56.5 years.

The patients were prescribed the antibiotics for upper respiratory illnesses (11 %), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (14 %) and ear- nose and throat infections (29.3 %). The azithromycin was administered as a Z Pack and the risk of an arrhythmia or cardiovascular death was increased for the 5 days the patient took the medication. For every million doses of azithromycin administered there were 228 deaths at five days and 422 at 10 days. For levaquin there were 384 deaths at five days and 714 deaths at 10 days per million prescriptions administered. Ampicillin showed far lower numbers with 154 deaths at 5 days and 324 deaths at 10 days per million prescriptions.

The overall risk of arrhythmia and cardiovascular death was quite low with all the medications but clearly levaquin carried a higher risk than azithromycin or amoxicillin. The risk of arrhythmia with levaquin was about the same with azithromycin.

This study points out another danger of taking antibiotics inappropriately or indiscriminately. We usually point out the dangers of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic related colitis when explaining to a patient why we do not want to prescribe an antibiotic when none is warranted. We can now add arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death to the list. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take an antibiotic when appropriate. It does mean we may want to avoid certain antibiotics in patients who have cardiovascular risk factors.

Cold and Flu Season Coming

SneezeAs we head into fall and winter we see an increase in the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the community. Most of these are simple self-limited infections that healthy individuals can weather after a period of a few days to a week of being uncomfortable from runny noses, sinus congestion, sore throats, coughs, aches and pains and sometimes fever. There are studies out of Scandinavia conducted in extreme cold temperature environments that show that taking an extra gram of Vitamin C per day reduces the number of these infections and the severity and duration in elite athletes and Special Forces military troops. Starting extra vitamin C once you develop symptoms does little to shorten the duration or lessen the intensity of the illness. Vigorous hand washing and avoidance of sick individuals helps as well. Flu shots prevent viral influenza and should be taken by all adults unless they have a specific contraindication to influenza. A cold is not the flu or influenza. Whooping cough or pertussis vaccination with TDap should be taken by all middle aged and senior adults as well to update their pertussis immunity. We often see pictures of individuals wearing cloth surgical masks in crowded areas to prevent being exposed to a viral illness. Those cloth surgical masks keep the wearers secretions and “germs” contained from others but do nothing to prevent infectious agents others are emitting from getting through the pores of the mask and infecting them. If you wish to wear a mask that is effective in keeping infectious agents out then you need to be using an N95 respirator mask.

Once you exhibit viral upper respiratory tract symptoms care is supportive. If you are a running a fever of 101 degrees or higher taking Tylenol or a NSAID will bring the fever down. Staying hydrated with warm fluids, soups and broths helps. Resting when tired helps. Most adults do not “catch” strep throat unless they are exposed to young children usually ages 2-7 that have strep throat. Sore throats feel better with warm fluids, throat lozenges and rest.

You need to see your doctor if you have a chronic illness such as asthma , COPD, heart failure or an immunosuppressive disease which impairs your immune system and you develop a viral illness with a fever of 100.8 or higher. . If your fever is 101 or greater for more than 24 hours it is the time to contact your doctor. Breathing difficulty is a red flag for the need to contact your physician immediately.

Most of these viral illnesses will make you feel miserable but will resolve on their own with rest, common sense and plenty of fluids.

It’s Only a Cold …

As a concierge medical practice we pride ourselves on being available to help our patients with access to the doctor by phone and same day appointments. At this time of year we are faced with daily phone calls regarding cold or flu like symptoms.  Thus, I thought it appropriate to share some topical information which should be useful in helping anyone decide whether they should “ride out the storm” or give their doctor a call.

There are at least 1,500 different known viruses that lead to a viral upper respiratory tract infection sometimes known as “the common cold”.   With these, a high sustained fever of 101 degrees Fahrenheit is rare.  Aches and pains, nasal discharge with runny nose and post nasal drip are common. Dry cough advancing to a barking cough productive of clear, yellow and often greenish phlegm is common as well.  You’ll most likely feel miserable. Your sinus and head congestion make you feel like you are in a tunnel, a sound chamber, or wearing a deep sea diving helmet. Your appetite waxes and wanes. You are exhausted with the activities of daily living.  Getting out of bed to wash your face and groom yourself may seem as challenging as a 26.5 mile race up a hill.

Currently, there is no cure for the common cold. Antibiotics do not work.  A “Z Pack “does not speed up the process. An injection of antibiotic does not make it go away faster. The infection could care less if you have a high school reunion to go to in Philadelphia, a grandchild’s bar mitzvah or baptism, or a flight to Paris for a combined work/pleasure excursion. Frankly, once you have this type of viral infection you will most likely have to ride out the storm.

Furthermore, going to the ER and sitting and waiting to be seen doesn’t make the infection go away quicker. Paying for a visit at a walk in center or urgent care center where you are more likely to negotiate successfully for an unwarranted or needed antibiotic will not help either.

In most instances, your recovery from the virus will take 7-14 days providing you drink plenty of warm fluids, rest when you are tired and use common sense. Cough medicine may ease the cough. Saline nasal solution may clear the nasal congestion. Judicious use of a nasal decongestant under your physician’s supervision may help as well.  It will take time. You are contagious. No you should not go to the gym if you are feeling poorly. Chicken soup, tincture of time, hot tea with honey, plenty of rest and common sense are recommended remedies.

If at any point you still feel you have the plague, dengue fever, the bird flu or the Ebola virus come on in. We will take a look, evaluate your symptoms and likely tell you, “It’s a cold.”