I Told My Daughter “Find Another Doctor!”

I have three adult daughters, all college graduates.  All are in long-term relationships with men,  children, dogs and careers.  I am “dad” and will always be dad.  I additionally happen to be a physician who cares for adult patients.  If they are ill or have a medical problem their first phone call is to my cell phone. If its not a phone call it’s a text message. I do not bring this up to give the impression that I am complaining about it. They are my children, I love them and always will.  Anything I can do to comfort or help them is always fine with me. 

I have stressed to them that they need to find a family physician or internist to handle their medical care  who is compassionate, available, caring, accessible and will advocate on their behalf. The older two are financially secure enough to find a concierge physician and I have encouraged that. My younger adult daughter lives about one hour south of my home and practice. She has a primary care physician under contract and on the panel of her Blue Cross Blue Shield PPO. That internist is an employee of the large medical health system that recently purchased my local community hospital. They have been purchasing doctors’ practices and putting in place hospital employed physicians with the speed and rapidity that a wildfire spreads in the dry California brush propelled by the Santa Anna winds.

My daughter called me this morning at 6:15 a.m. with a 102-degree fever, sudden onset of body aches, chills, sweats and “ a killer sore throat”   She is vaccinated against influenza but had a Flu Assay positive case in December 2022. She wondered if she could catch flu again.   

My toddler grandchildren attend daycare and pre-school and bring home febrile viral illnesses in abundance almost weekly.  Bacterial Streptococcal infections and Respiratory Syncytial Virus are epidemic locally along with flu and high risk of COVID, per the CDC and not our Florida Department of Public Health.  Her COVID home antigen test was negative so after taking some Tylenol and throat lozenges she called her family physician.  She was told to, “Go to Urgent Care.  We Don’t see sick people in the office.”

At the beginning of the Sars 2 Coronavirus pandemic most physicians were unvaccinated and unprotected against COVID-19 and we followed the advice of the CDC in referring patients to COVID-19  test sites for testing. We conducted phone calls with patients and telehealth visits. With five COVID vaccines, and an abundance of at-home quick tests available locally, most of us are now seeing sick patients in our offices again as long as we know their COVID test status. 

In my practice, pre-COVID and pre-Concierge Medicine, we always adjusted our schedules to include patients who had an acute febrile illness and were not in respiratory distress. I knew most of these illnesses were caused by viruses and required nothing more than fluids, Tylenol, cough syrup and tincture of time.  Most did have multiple medical and metabolic conditions as well which exacerbated with the infection. The purpose of the visit was to make sure the other conditions, exacerbated by the viral infection, didn’t exacerbate. To accommodate our sick patients, we started the day earlier, worked through lunch at times and stayed late if need be.

When my daughter called me from the urgent care center facing a 90-minute wait, she asked me what she should do.  I suggested she wait it out, see the physician and when she felt better find another doctor. I understand the reason for not bringing an acute COVID patient into the office. For everything else there is no excuse for only seeing “well” patients. Our job is to keep our patients healthy.  What value are we if we don’t see them when they are ill?

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Home with COVID

Had the entire family in from out of town this Thanksgiving. Awoke Thanksgiving Day, turned to get out of bed and felt something snap in my lower back. Since I have been fortunate to never have had back issues before, I just stretched it out over several minutes on the floor and went about my business as best I could. Walking produced sciatic pain down my right leg. I walked the dog in pain, stretched again, took some acetaminophen and let my younger relatives provide the physical work I usually do to set up tables and clean up after dinner.

It was a long weekend and while my energy level was down, I had no symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection. None of my adult kids were ill on arrival the week before. My toddler age grandchildren, now back at preschool, are always sick with viral illnesses but their COVID tests were negative.

The last visitor left for home Sunday and that afternoon my wife said she ached all over and felt like she had been suddenly hit by a truck. A quick COVID test was negative. The next morning, a bit more tired than usual, I returned to my office to see patients. At lunch time I ran home with an influenza test and a few home COVID antigen tests. Her influenza test was negative. Her COVID test immediately showed positive, so we repeated it and it was still positive. At that point I tested myself and sure enough it was immediately positive.

Four weeks prior I would have contacted my local hospital monoclonal antibody program and we would have received bebtelivamib without having to worry about drug/drug interactions or adverse reactions. That drug is no longer available due to the virus mutating and developing resistance.

We called our internist and he prescribed Paxlovid for five days to prevent progression to serious illness in high-risk patients. My wife had to stop her calcium channel blood pressure pill, stop her cholesterol lowering pill and reduce her anti-anxiety medications to take Paxlovid. For me it required stopping a blood pressure pill and realizing that maybe my back pain was the first sign of COVID and that put me at Day 5 of symptoms which is the latest you can effectively start Paxlovid. The drug leaves a persistent metallic taste in your mouth. It wears away at about twelve hours just when it is time to take the next dosage.

I cancelled my office patients for the week knowing that my associate would see anyone that required an in-person visit. I can still return phone calls and perform telehealth visits if a patient requests it. I just do not want to transmit a disease to a healthy patient in for a routine checkup.

Some tasks you cannot hand off. I was up walking the dog this morning when I met a long-time neighbor who I respect but differ with on politics drastically. He asked how I was, and I told him I had COVID and asked him to please safely keep his distance for his safety. With that he coughed repeatedly, told me he was sick for several days and thought there was no point in testing for COVID. He clearly sounded far more symptomatic from some viral illness than I was. He said after his walk he was going to synagogue and then to work. He asked me why I bothered to take the test at all.

I referred him to an article in the day’s Wall Street Journal that claims that nine out of ten COVID related deaths are occurring in men and women 65 years of age and older and my wife and I fit into that category. There are still 300 deaths per day from COVID in the USA .

With a positive test I wanted to have every opportunity to prevent serious illness in my wife. Since I live and work in a senior citizen rich community, I didn’t want to spread the disease to others either.

Somehow as a nation we have lost our moral compass regarding age and this disease. The death toll from COVID in the older age group far exceeds that from influenza despite the claims of Florida freedom politicians. The tradeoff of keeping everything open, with no protection for seniors on buses, planes , airports, subways and office buildings seems like age discrimination to me. Changes in public policy by the national administration, CDC and public health officials in advance of the midterm elections may have helped “ save democracy” but certainly are not protecting elders like my patient population.

My wife and I will survive. After five days of Paxlovid we will start retesting with a quick antigen test. I fear for my neighbors over 65 years old who don’t have the knowledge, access or experience to recognize and treat this disease.

Tdap Booster Vaccinations

Several years ago an epidemic of whooping cough (pertussis) was ongoing in affluent areas of California and Arizona. Epidemiologists from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and National Institute of Health (NIH) descended on those areas to determine the cause of the life threatening illness to very young children.

Much to their surprise, grandparents were inadvertently transmitting it to their new and not completely vaccinated grandchildren. As youngsters, these grandparents took the suggested DPT series of shots believing they were resistant to diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus for life.

Like most things, as we get older, the immune system just doesn’t work as well. The immunity to pertussis waned and adults were catching the adult version of whooping cough in the form of an upper respiratory tract infection with bronchitis. The adult version resembled a run of the mill viral upper respiratory tract infection with a prolonged barking cough. This was just the type of infection which infectious disease experts were suggesting we do not treat with antibiotics and instead let our immune systems fight off independently. Unknown to us was the fact that even after we stopped coughing, if this was in fact adult whooping cough, we could transmit the pertussis bacteria for well over a year after we stopped coughing.

The solution to the problem was to give these adults a booster shot against pertussis when they received their tetanus shot booster. It is recommended that we get a tetanus booster every seven to ten years.

Tdap, produced by Sanofli Pasteur, was the solution and an international campaign of vaccination was begun. The campaign was successful but what do you do seven to ten years later when the next tetanus shot is due? In a study sponsored by the manufacturer, adults 18- 64, were given a second dosage 8-10 years after the first Tdap shot and tolerated it very well. Blood levels for immunogenicity taken 28 days later showed the benefit of the second shot.

The data has been submitted to the CDC and its vaccination Prevention Advisory Panel for consideration for a change in the recommendations on vaccinating adults.

Chocolate as a Cough Suppressant

Well before Valentine’s Day, and conspicuously in the middle of cold and flu season, Alyn Morice of the University of Hull in Yorkshire, England published a study showing that dark chocolate derivatives may be more effective than codeine in suppressing a cough. In a small study of 163 individuals, each with a cough due to an infection, her group randomly assigned them to a group receiving a codeine based cough syrup or a chocolate cocoa based syrup called Rococo. Their results showed that within two days the chocolate based recipients felt significant improvement in their cough compared to the codeine based group. A similar study had previously been performed at the imperial College in London showing that theobromine, a product in cocoa, is superior to suppressing coughs over codeine.

Professor Morice believes the properties in cocoa are demulcent and help relieve irritation and inflammation. “This simply means it is stickier and more viscous than standard cough medicines, so it forms a coating which protects nerve endings in the throat which trigger the urge to cough. This demulcent effect explains why honey and lemon and other sugary syrups help.” They believe chocolate has additional helpful ingredients so much so that they advise sucking on a piece of dark chocolate as a mechanism of relieving a cough. We now have some science to back mom’s hot chocolate and hot cocoa for a cold and a cough.

Winter is the Season for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Influenza

It’s the season for winter viral upper respiratory tract system infections. It is also influenza and influenza- like illness season.

Winter brings crowds of people indoors together and holiday travel places crowds together in indoor areas as well. These viral illnesses are transmissible by hand to mouth transmission and airborne particle transmission with coughing. The viral particles can live with minimal water on surfaces for long enough periods of time to infect patients who unknowingly touch a foreign surface and bring their hands up to their mouths. Hand washing frequently is an essential part of preventing the transmission of these diseases. Common courtesy such as covering your mouth when you sneeze or cough and not coming in close contact with others when ill is essential.

Research has shown that consuming an extra 500 mg a day of Vitamin C can prevent colds and reduce the intensity of a cold if you catch one. You must take the Vitamin C all the time and in advance of exposure. Waiting until you have symptoms has no positive effect. Viral upper respiratory tract infections usually include fatigue, runny nose (coryza), sore throat (less than 90 % of adult sore throats are not a strep throat).

If you have been around a sick child age 2-7 who has a fever, swollen neck glands and an exudative sore throat your chances of having a strep throat are increased. Fever is usually low grade, less than 101, and short lived. Very often patients develop viral inflammation of the conjunctiva or conjunctivitis. While this is very contagious to others, it is self-limited and rarely requires intervention or treatment.

Caring for a cold involves listening to your body and practicing common sense solutions. Rest if tired. Don’t go to the gym and workout if you feel ill. If you insist on going, warm up slowly and thoroughly and, if you do not feel well, stop the workout.

Sore throat can be treated with lozenges. Warm fluids including tea and honey (honey is antimicrobial and anti-viral), chicken soup, saline nasal spray for congestion and acetaminophen for aches and pains or fever are mainstays of treatment. Over the counter cough medications like guaifenisin help.

Some of the viruses affect your gastrointestinal tract causing cramps and diarrhea. Nausea and vomiting are sometimes present as well. The key is to put your bowel to rest, stay hydrated and avoid contaminating or infecting others. Clear liquids, ice chips, shaved ices, Italian ices or juice pops will keep you hydrated. A whiff of an alcohol swab will relieve the nausea as well. If you are having trouble keeping food or fluids down call your doctor. If you are taking prescription medications, call your doctor and see which ones, if any, you can take a drug holiday from until you are better.

Influenza is more severe. It is almost always accompanied by fever and aches and pains. Prevention involves taking a seasonal flu shot. Flu shots are effective in keeping individuals out of the hospital from complications of influenza. They are not perfect but far better than no prevention. If you run a fever of 100.8 or higher, and ache all over, call your physician. An influenza nasal swab can confirm influenza A and B 70 % of the time.

The new molecular test which can provide results in under an hour is far more accurate but not available at most urgent care or walk in centers or physician offices. Immediate treatment with Osetamivir (Tamiflu) and the newer Peramivir are effective at reducing the duration and intensity of the infection if started early. Hydration with clear fluids, rest, acetaminophen or anti-inflammatories for fever in adults 101 or greater and rest is the mainstay of treatment. Prolonged fever or respiratory distress requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor immediately.

I get asked frequently for a way to speed up the healing. “My children are coming down to visit. We have a cruise planned. I am flying in 48 hours on business.”  I am certainly sympathetic but these illnesses need to run their course. They are not interested in our personal or professional schedule and everyone you come in contact with is a potential new victim. If you are congested in the nose or throat, and or sinuses, then travelling by plane is putting you at risk of severe pain and damage to your ear drum. See your doctor first. Patients and pilots with nasal congestion are advised not to fly for seven to ten days for just this reason.

If you have multiple chronic illnesses including heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease and you run a fever or feel miserable then call your doctor and make arrangements to be seen. It will not necessarily speed up the healing but it will identify who actually requires antibiotics and additional follow up and tests and who can let nature take its course.

CDC and ACP: Stop Prescribing Antibiotics for Common Respiratory Infections

The Affordable Health Care Act has created patient satisfaction surveys which can affect a physician’s reimbursement for services rendered plus their actual employment by large insurers and health care systems. This has created a fear of not giving patients something or something they want at visits for colds, sore throats and other viral illnesses. Aaron M Harris, MD, MPH, an internist and epidemiologist with the CDC noted that antibiotics are prescribed at 100 million ambulatory visits annually and 41% of these prescriptions are for respiratory conditions. The unnecessary use of antibiotics has resulted in an increasing number of bacteria developing resistance to common antibiotics and to a surge in Emergency Department visits for adverse effects of these medications plus the development of antibiotic related colitis. To address the issue of overuse of antibiotics, Dr Harris and associates conducted a literature review of evidence based data on the use of antibiotics and its effects and presented guidelines for antibiotic use endorsed by the American College of Physicians and the Center for Disease Control.

  1. Physicians should not prescribe antibiotics for patients with uncomplicated bronchitis unless they suspect pneumonia are present”. Acute bronchitis is among the e most common adult outpatient diagnoses, with about 100 million ambulatory care visits in the US per year, more than 70% of which result in a prescription for antibiotics.” The authors suggested using cough suppressants, expectorants, first generation antihistamines, and decongestants for symptom relief.
  2. Patients who have a sore throat (pharyngitis) should only receive an antibiotic if they have confirmed group A streptococcal pharyngitis. Harris group estimates that antibiotics for adult sore throats are needed less than 2% of the time but are prescribed at most outpatient visits for pharyngitis. Physicians say it is quicker and easier to write a prescription than it is to explain to the patient why they do not need an antibiotic.
  3. Sinusitis and the common cold result in overprescribing and unnecessary use of antibiotics often. Over four million adults are diagnosed with sinusitis annually and more than 80% of their ambulatory visits result in the prescribing of an antibiotic unnecessarily. “ Treatment with antibiotics should be reserved for patients with acute rhinosinusitis who have persistent symptoms for more than ten days, nasal discharge or facial pain that lasts more than 3 consecutive days and signs of high fever with onset of severe symptoms. They also suggest patients who had a simple sinusitis or cold that lasted five days and suddenly gets worse (double sickening) qualified for an antibiotic

Last year two patients in the practice who were treated with antibiotics prescribed elsewhere for situations outside the current guidelines developed severe antibiotic related colitis. They presented with fever, severe abdominal pain and persistent watery bloody diarrhea. Usual treatment with oral vancomycin and cholestyramine did not cure the illness. One patient lost thirty pounds, the other sixty pounds. Fecal transplants were required to quell the disease. At the same time community based urine infections now require a change in antibiotic selection because so many of the organisms are now resistant to the less toxic, less expensive , less complicated antibiotics that traditionally worked.

“My doctor always gives me an antibiotic and I know my body and what it needs,” can no longer be the criteria for antibiotic use.

Cold and Flu Season Coming

As we head into fall and winter we see an increase in the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the community. Most of these are simple self-limited infections that healthy individuals can weather after a period of a few days to a week of being uncomfortable from runny noses, sinus congestion, sore throats, coughs, aches and pains and sometimes fever. There are studies out of Scandinavia conducted in extreme cold temperature environments that show that taking an extra gram of Vitamin C per day reduces the number of these infections and the severity and duration in elite athletes and Special Forces military troops. Starting extra vitamin C once you develop symptoms does little to shorten the duration or lessen the intensity of the illness. Vigorous hand washing and avoidance of sick individuals helps as well. Flu shots prevent viral influenza and should be taken by all adults unless they have a specific contraindication to influenza. A cold is not the flu or influenza. Whooping cough or pertussis vaccination with TDap should be taken by all middle aged and senior adults as well to update their pertussis immunity. We often see pictures of individuals wearing cloth surgical masks in crowded areas to prevent being exposed to a viral illness. Those cloth surgical masks keep the wearers secretions and “germs” contained from others but do nothing to prevent infectious agents others are emitting from getting through the pores of the mask and infecting them. If you wish to wear a mask that is effective in keeping infectious agents out then you need to be using an N95 respirator mask.

Once you exhibit viral upper respiratory tract symptoms care is supportive. If you are a running a fever of 101 degrees or higher taking Tylenol or a NSAID will bring the fever down. Staying hydrated with warm fluids, soups and broths helps. Resting when tired helps. Most adults do not “catch” strep throat unless they are exposed to young children usually ages 2-7 that have strep throat. Sore throats feel better with warm fluids, throat lozenges and rest.

You need to see your doctor if you have a chronic illness such as asthma , COPD, heart failure or an immunosuppressive disease which impairs your immune system and you develop a viral illness with a fever of 100.8 or higher. If your fever is 101 or greater for more than 24 hours it is the time to contact your doctor. Breathing difficulty is a red flag for the need to contact your physician immediately.

Most of these viral illnesses will make you feel miserable but will resolve on their own with rest, common sense and plenty of fluids.

Adult Sore Throats 2015 – 2016 Flu Season

Robert Centor, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, performed the definitive study on adult sore throats showing that 10% or less of adult sore throats are caused by bacteria particularly Group A Streptococcus . He went on to prove that bacterial Strep throats were accompanied by a cough, large swollen and tender lymph nodes, a temperature greater than 100.4 and an exudate on your tonsils. The disease is primarily seen in children age 2-7 and those who care for them and play with them. In adults who did not meet the criteria of having a cough, swollen and enlarged lymph nodes, a temperature of 100.4 and a tonsillar exudate, a rapid streptococcus throat swab was accurate 100 % of the time. If the quick strep analysis is negative you do not have a strep throat and do not require an antibiotic. We had two patients this past fall who did not meet the criteria of Dr. Centor, did not have the physical findings consistent with a strep throat, had a negative quick strep throat swab but upon performing a traditional throat culture were found to be positive for Group a Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus requiring antibiotics. Why did the discrepancy occur? According to the manufacturer they had to recall a batch of diagnostic material that was ineffective. Both patients were placed on antibiotics soon after their clinical course did not follow the path of a viral infection and both did well.

Most adult sore throats and colds do not require antibiotics. We reserve them for patient with debilitating chronic illnesses especially advanced pulmonary, cardiac and neurologic disease patients. With influenza season on the horizon we will continue to assess patient’s clinically using history, exam, quick strep throat swabs and traditional microbiological throat cultures where appropriate. I will continue to prescribe antibiotics where necessary but must admit, last years’ experience opened my eyes to a more liberal approach with the prescribing of antibiotics for simple sore throats.

Is that Z Pack for the Cough Safe? Do Antibiotics Trigger Arrhythmias?

Azithromycin“Hello Dr Reznick, this is JP, I have a runny nose, a cough productive of yellowish green phlegm, a scratchy throat and I ache all over. My northern doctor always gives me a Z Pack or levaquin or Cipro when I get this. I know my body well and I need an antibiotic. Saul and I are scheduled to go see the children and grandchildren next week and I want to knock this out of my system. Can you just call in a Z-Pack? I don’t have time to come in for a visit.”

This is a common phone call at my internal medicine practice. Despite the Center for Disease Control and the American Academy of Infectious Disease Physicians running an education al campaign on the correct use of antibiotics, patients still want what they want , when they want it. The Annals of Family Medicine , March/April issue contained a study by G. Rao, M.D., PhD of the University of South Carolina in Columbia which examined whether a Z Pack (azithromycin) or a fluroquinolone (levaquin) can cause arrhythmias and an increased risk of death. Their study was a result of a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine that proved that macrolide antibiotics were associated with a higher cardiovascular death risk and rate than penicillin type antibiotics such as amoxicillin. To examine this issue closely, Rao and associates examined data from U.S. veterans who received outpatient treatment with amoxicillin (979,380 patients), azithromycin (Z Pack 594,792 patients) and levofloxacin (levaquin 201,798 patients). These were patients in the VA health system between 1999 and April 2012. Their average age was 56.5 years.

The patients were prescribed the antibiotics for upper respiratory illnesses (11 %), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (14 %) and ear- nose and throat infections (29.3 %). The azithromycin was administered as a Z Pack and the risk of an arrhythmia or cardiovascular death was increased for the 5 days the patient took the medication. For every million doses of azithromycin administered there were 228 deaths at five days and 422 at 10 days. For levaquin there were 384 deaths at five days and 714 deaths at 10 days per million prescriptions administered. Ampicillin showed far lower numbers with 154 deaths at 5 days and 324 deaths at 10 days per million prescriptions.

The overall risk of arrhythmia and cardiovascular death was quite low with all the medications but clearly levaquin carried a higher risk than azithromycin or amoxicillin. The risk of arrhythmia with levaquin was about the same with azithromycin.

This study points out another danger of taking antibiotics inappropriately or indiscriminately. We usually point out the dangers of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic related colitis when explaining to a patient why we do not want to prescribe an antibiotic when none is warranted. We can now add arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death to the list. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take an antibiotic when appropriate. It does mean we may want to avoid certain antibiotics in patients who have cardiovascular risk factors.

Cold and Flu Season Coming

SneezeAs we head into fall and winter we see an increase in the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the community. Most of these are simple self-limited infections that healthy individuals can weather after a period of a few days to a week of being uncomfortable from runny noses, sinus congestion, sore throats, coughs, aches and pains and sometimes fever. There are studies out of Scandinavia conducted in extreme cold temperature environments that show that taking an extra gram of Vitamin C per day reduces the number of these infections and the severity and duration in elite athletes and Special Forces military troops. Starting extra vitamin C once you develop symptoms does little to shorten the duration or lessen the intensity of the illness. Vigorous hand washing and avoidance of sick individuals helps as well. Flu shots prevent viral influenza and should be taken by all adults unless they have a specific contraindication to influenza. A cold is not the flu or influenza. Whooping cough or pertussis vaccination with TDap should be taken by all middle aged and senior adults as well to update their pertussis immunity. We often see pictures of individuals wearing cloth surgical masks in crowded areas to prevent being exposed to a viral illness. Those cloth surgical masks keep the wearers secretions and “germs” contained from others but do nothing to prevent infectious agents others are emitting from getting through the pores of the mask and infecting them. If you wish to wear a mask that is effective in keeping infectious agents out then you need to be using an N95 respirator mask.

Once you exhibit viral upper respiratory tract symptoms care is supportive. If you are a running a fever of 101 degrees or higher taking Tylenol or a NSAID will bring the fever down. Staying hydrated with warm fluids, soups and broths helps. Resting when tired helps. Most adults do not “catch” strep throat unless they are exposed to young children usually ages 2-7 that have strep throat. Sore throats feel better with warm fluids, throat lozenges and rest.

You need to see your doctor if you have a chronic illness such as asthma , COPD, heart failure or an immunosuppressive disease which impairs your immune system and you develop a viral illness with a fever of 100.8 or higher. . If your fever is 101 or greater for more than 24 hours it is the time to contact your doctor. Breathing difficulty is a red flag for the need to contact your physician immediately.

Most of these viral illnesses will make you feel miserable but will resolve on their own with rest, common sense and plenty of fluids.