NSAIDS and Heart Failure in Type II Diabetics

The European Society of Cardiology is receiving a presentation on the increased risk of heart failure occurring in Type II Diabetics over the age of 65 years with an elevated HgbA1C level. The mechanism of the heart failure is still under discussion and being researched and it is believed to be beyond the accepted increased retention of fluid that occurs when you take an oral NSAID. The risk of developing heart failure was increased by almost 50% in Type II Diabetics 65 years of age or older. It was clearly not seen in patients with a normal HgbA1C younger than 65 years of age.

The study was led by Anders Halt, MD, a cardiologist and epidemiologist, who accessed the Danish National Health Registry to obtain his raw data. In his study it was clear that older age and elevated HgbA1C were present in those patients developing heart failure and requiring treatment and/or hospitalization. In Denmark patients were using Diclofenac Sodium and Ibuprofen primarily with few using celexocab or naproxen products.

As we age, we develop joint inflammation and aches and pains that make us reach for an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication frequently. This study raises the question clearly “If you are a Type II diabetic over sixty-five years of age with poorly controlled sugars should you be looking elsewhere than NSAIDs for relief”. Diclofenac sodium is no longer in oral form in the USA, but ibuprofen certainly is. The study clearly outlines the need for exploration of the mechanism of the heart failure. I believe the reason heart failure occurs must be clarified but until that occurs older Type II diabetics should be wary of reaching for an NSAID for relief of aches and pains.

Cocoa Flavonoids & Avocados May Protect Against Cardiovascular Death

The COSMOS study, sponsored by Pfizer and Mars Candies, looked at the effect of Cocoa flavonoids on cardiovascular events such as a heart attack, cardiovascular deaths and consumption of cocoa flavonoids and green tea. There were 21,442 U.S. adults in the study followed for 3.6 years.

The experimental group received cocoa and green tea. While there were just as many cardiovascular events in the study group as in the control group, the number of deaths dropped by 27%. The study was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and was commented on by David Rakel, MD, FAAFP in the online medical journal Primary Care.

Flavonoids are found in dark colored grapes and berries, apples, pears, green tea and dark chocolate. If you eat 1/4 of a dark chocolate bar you are getting the same dosage the experimental group was given in this study.

Dr. Rakel suggested that Flavonoids maintain the flexibility of the blood vessels as we age. Recent related studies indicate a handful of blueberries or cranberries daily have similar effects. A glass of red wine with a square of dark chocolate and some dark berries suddenly sounds like a healthy snack!

Avocados apparently convey cardiovascular protection as well. In a study published in the March 30, 2022 Journal of the American Heart Association researchers followed 110,00 adults for 30 plus years and found that those who consumed two or more servings of avocado a week had a much lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease then non consumers.

An Extra Tablespoon of Olive Oil Per Day May Keep Death Away

Dr. Marta Guash-Ferre’ and team at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health evaluated whether substituting a teaspoon of olive oil daily to replace margarine, butter, mayonnaise and dairy fat led to a drop in the likelihood of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, dementia and respiratory diseases.

Her team looked at 92,00 participants who were free of cancer and cardiovascular disease in 1990. Every four years, for the next 28 years of follow-up, the researchers assessed each person’s diet through a detailed questionnaire. Olive oil consumption was determined from olive oil used on salads, cooking, or used on breads and foods.

Their long-term calculations showed that olive oil consumption increased in the study participants during the test period while consumption of margarine decreased, and other fats stayed the same. Participants with higher olive oil consumption were more likely to be physically active, less likely to smoke, consumed more fruits and vegetables than lower olive oil consumers. When the researchers compared those with little olive oil consumption to those with the highest consumption, the high consumers had a 19% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, a 17%lower risk of cancer death, a 29% lower risk of death from dementia and an 18% lower risk of respiratory disease death. The study also concluded that substituting ten grams of olive oil per day (a bit less than one tablespoon) for other fats such as butter, margarine, mayonnaise, and dairy fat their death risk dropped by 8-34% from all causes.

In reviewing the data, its seems that their study group represented an extremely well-educated health-conscious group of individuals. Substituting olive oil for other fats is certainly a worthy goal based on these numbers and I will certainly aim to try it.

Aspirin & Heart Disease Prevention Recommendations

In the 1950’s a research paper based on work done at a Veterans Administration Hospital found that men 45 years of age who took a daily aspirin tended to have fewer heart attacks and strokes. The VA patients were mostly male WWII and Korean War Veterans. That was the basis for most of the men in my Baby Boomer generation to take a daily aspirin.

Yes, we knew that aspirin gives us an increased risk of bleeding from our stomach and intestine. And we knew that if we hit our head while on aspirin the amount of bleeding on the brain would be much greater. It was a tradeoff – benefits versus risks.

Over the years the science has advanced to now distinguish those taking aspirin to prevent developing heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or primary prevention and those seeking to prevent an additional health event such as a second heart attack or stroke. To my knowledge there are no studies that examine what happens to someone in their 60a or 70s who has been taking an aspirin for 40 plus years daily and suddenly stops. It’s a question that should be answered before electively stopping daily aspirin.

Over the last few years researchers have hinted that the daily aspirin may protect against developing colorectal cancer and certain aggressive skin cancers. The downside to taking the aspirin has always been the bleeding risk. This data is now being questioned by the USPTF looking for more “evidence.”

The US Preventive Services Task Force was formed in 1984 with the encouragement of employers, private insurers selling managed health care plans and members of Congress to try and save money in healthcare. It is comprised of volunteer physicians and researchers who are supposed to match evidence with medical procedures to ensure that we are receiving high value procedures only.

In 1998 Congress mandated that they convene annually. Under their direction, recommendations were made to stop taking routine chest x rays on adult smokers because it didn’t save or prolong life and it took $200,000 of X Rays to save one life. They reversed their opinion decades later deciding that the math on that study wasn’t quite right and now recommend CT scans on smokers of a certain age and duration of tobacco use. I point this out to emphasize why I am not quite as excited today about their change in aspirin guidelines as the newspaper and media outlet stations seem to be.

I am a never smoker, frequently exercising adult with high blood pressure controlled with medication, high cholesterol controlled with medication and recently diagnosed non obstructive coronary artery disease. What does that mean? At age 45 my CT Scan of my coronary arteries showed almost no calcium in the walls. 26 years later there is enough Calcium seen to increase my risk of a cardiac event to > 10% over the next ten years. I took a nuclear stress test and ran at level 5 with no evidence of a blockage on EKG or films. The calcium in the walls of the arteries however indicates that cholesterol laden foam cells living in the walls of my coronary arteries and moving towards the lumen to rupture and cause a heart attack were thwarted and calcified preventing that heart attack or stroke. I am certainly not going to stop my aspirin.

My thin healthy friend who works out harder than I do told me he doesn’t have heart disease and is going to stop his baby aspirin. I asked him what about his three stents keeping several coronary arteries open? He told me he had heart disease before he got the stents but now he doesn’t. I suggested he talk to his internist or cardiologist prior to stopping the aspirin.

I may take a different path in starting adults on aspirin for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event protection. I am certainly not going to withdraw aspirin from patients taking it for years unless they are high risk for falls and head trauma or bleeding. I suggest you ask your doctor before considering changing any of your medications.

Try an exercise by writing down all the prescription medicines and next to them list what condition you take them for. Once you have established that information, set up an appointment and talk about it with your physician. The decision-making is much more complicated than the USPTF and headline hungry media discussed and reported.

Walnuts Lowered LDL Cholesterol in Seniors

Emilio Ros, MD, PhD led the Walnuts and Healthy Aging Study (WAHA) looking at healthy seniors in Loma Linda, California and Barcelona, Spain. He followed 636 patients who were randomly assigned to a walnut supplemented diet or walnut free diet.

Senior Citizens who ate a diet supplemented with walnuts lowered their LDL cholesterol significantly.  The walnut supplemented group exhibited a reduction of total cholesterol of 8.5 mg/dl with an LDL cholesterol reduction of 4.3 mg/dl.  Triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were not affected. In addition to lowering cholesterol, Dr. Ros said other studies showed a positive result in lowering blood pressure. 

Christie Ballantyne MD, chief of cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine, and director of cardiovascular disease prevention at Methodist DeBakey Heart Center, said nutritional studies are difficult to complete. The number of participants is usually small and the length of the study short. This study encompassed large numbers over two years in two different locales. 

Dr. Ros commented that adults are always wondering what can they eat as a healthy snack?  Walnuts can now be added to that list.

Safety & Efficacy of Lowering Lipids in the Elderly

I am bombarded regularly by older patients, their adult children and various elements of the media with complaints that elderly are taking too many medicines. Poly pharmacy is the word they use and the first prescription medications they want eliminated are their cholesterol lowering drugs – either a statin (Lipitor, Zocor, Pravachol, Crestor , Livalo or their generic form), Zetia ( Eztimebe) or the newer injectable PCSK9 inhibitors Repatha and Praluent. Is there an age that we should stop these medications? Is there benefit in the elderly to continue taking them? Should we start these medications in the elderly if we discover they have high cholesterol and vascular disease?

A recent study was published in the prestigious Lancet medical journal. The authors looked at 29 trials with 244,090 patients. From this pool there were 21,492 patients who were at least 75 years old. Half of them were on oral statin drugs and the others were on Eztimebe or PCSK9 inhibitors. They were followed from 2 – 6 years.

The results showed that for every reduction of LDL cholesterol of 1mmol/L there was a 26% reduction of in major adverse vascular events. These numbers were similar to those in younger patients. The data also pointed out that these patients had a significant reduction in cardiovascular deaths, myocardial infarction (heart attacks), strokes and the need for heart surgical revascularizations. It was extremely clear that if you are on a cholesterol lowering drug you should stay on that medication despite your age!

A study in JAMA internal medicine, authored by LC Yourman, answered the question of whether you are too old to start on a cholesterol lowering drug. They found that it took 2.5 years before the cholesterol lowering medicine reduced your risk of a major cardiovascular event. Their conclusion was that if you are 70 or older, and your lifespan appears to be greater than 2.5 years, you should start the medicine.

Can Smartphones & Fitbits Interfere with your Pacemaker or Defibrillator?

The February 8th edition of Medpage Today, an online magazine, published the concerns of cardiologist and electrophysiologist Joshua Greenberg, MD, about the magnet arrays in the new Apple iPhone 12 interfering with the function of pacemakers and defibrillators.

When a patient goes to their doctor, cardiologist, electrophysiologist, etc., and the physician wishes to turn off their pacemaker to look at the heart’s normal electrical activity, they normally place a magnet over the implanted device to deactivate it. The new iPhone 12 apparently uses an array of magnets around a wireless charging coil.

Dr Greenberg used the iPhone 12 to disable a Medtronic ICD. Once he brought the phone over the patients left chest the device deactivated. His findings were published in January in a letter to the editor of the journal Heart Rhythm. “This is a big deal because if the patient were to go into ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation during this time, they would just drop dead without receiving a life-saving shock from the ICD.”

Separately, electrophysiologist M. Eskander, MD tweeted a video showing an iPhone12 shutting off a pacemaker as well as if a magnet had been placed over it. Wristband magnets in Fitbit and Apple iWatches have been reported to deactivate Medtronic ICDs from 0.9” away due to their wristband magnets.

Phil Mar, MD , an electrophysiologist at Saint Louis University School of Medicine agrees that this is a previously unrecognized issue that needs to be dealt with. He suggests patients with implanted pacemakers and ICDs avoid purchasing an iPhone with magnets. He encourages their spouses or bed partners to follow the same advice to prevent deactivation when they roll over and get close. He emphasizes that this was not an issue with earlier model iPhones which didn’t have an array of magnets and was not seen in Apple iWatches without the magnetic wrist bands for charging. He is concerned that any cell phone, wrist band or watch using wireless charging may cause the same deactivation.

The author of the article, Anthony Pearson, MD made the suggestion that patients with pacemakers and ICDs should have their cardiologist or electrophysiologist routinely test their cell phones, Fitbits and iWatches’ effect on their devices at a planned routine visit and certainly immediately after implantation. He reminded us this does not occur in devices that do not have a magnet array which is most cell phones and watches.

There has always been a recommendation that if you have a pacemaker or AICD you use your cellphone in the ear opposite your pacemaker or device pocket and never bring it within six inches of the device.

Blood pressure measurement, its importance in reducing vascular disease & remote patient monitoring

An article published in the prestigious journal Hypertension looked at following blood pressure over a decade and the reduction in heart attacks, strokes and deaths if you were able to keep blood pressure under control. It talked about extending your life by over four years and the preventing vascular disease from developing for at least five years.

The authors looked at multiple blood pressure trials and noted the difficulty in relying on one office visit measurement periodically. They too noticed that certain patients were always higher in the office than at home and noted the problems with home blood pressure monitors including trying to decide if they were accurate and being recorded correctly. The result was that whatever reading they obtained at your visit, when looked at over a 10-year period, influenced your survival and cardiac events.

We too have struggled with this issue in our office. We ask patients to bring in their home blood pressure equipment so we can correlate the readings they get in our office on our equipment and their equipment. Just last night a patient with no symptoms and feeling well took his blood pressure and found it elevated. Rather than contact me or his cardiologist he ran to the Emergency Room. He waited hours, had multiple tests and by that time his blood pressure lowered they referred him to his doctors without intervening at all.

When needed, we have a patient use a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor. They wear it on their arm like a blood pressure cuff and it inflates six times per hour during daytime and four times per hour during sleep while measuring their pressure. There is a small recording device worn on their belt. After 24 hours, it is returned to our office and we print out the readings and obtain averages to help us determine just what your blood pressure really is. The equipment has a diary so the patient can note when stressful events occur and we can correlate it with the readings. The minor drawbacks to the equipment are its bulkiness, the need to keep it dry and the disturbance to sleep it causes as the cuff inflates and deflates.

To improve measurements, as well as capture other health metrics, we are introducing a remote monitoring smart wristband. We have identified a vendor who will supply you with the high-tech wrist band at no out-of-pocket expense to you. The wristband interacts with your iPhone or android phone.

The device measures and captures pulse, heart rhythm, blood pressure, blood oxygen level, and steps.  It even has built-in fall detection. The 2021 model, which will be introduced in a few months, has an EKG component to help us follow patients who get dizzy, faint or have documented heart issues. It will also capture body temperature. There is an optional blood glucose sensor monitoring device. The wristband is water resistant so you may shower with it.

Due to the Pandemic, and development of tele-health, Medicare pays for the monitoring if you wear the device a minimum of 16 days each month. Patients are asked to identify emergency contacts so that if you fall or if you have an arrhythmia, abnormal blood pressure, abnormal blood sugar, the monitoring call center contacts your emergency contact on record.

Your physician can view all the data on our computers. Certain private insurances pay for these services as well as Medicare. I will start wearing one and my wife will as well.

I will personally discuss this with each of you whom I feel will benefit from wearing the wristband as remote monitoring is proven to reduce hospital admissions and ER visits. If you have a chronic condition, disease or certain risk factors; it’s likely I will encourage you to wear the band.

Some patients have asked if the band has a panic button for you to push if you feel you need to such as after a fall. The technology senses if you fell and have not gotten up or if you are ill and calls your emergency contacts but it does not have a unique panic button to push.

We look forward to introducing this new remote high technology to improve your health, safety and peace of mind.

Cholesterol Lowering Statin Drugs DO NOT Encourage Cognitive Decline

Statin drugs are used to lower cholesterol levels in the hope of preventing vascular disease including heart disease, strokes, peripheral arterial vascular disease. They have been safely prescribed to millions of people for years showing great effectiveness.  However, a cloud hangs over them over side effects glorified in the lay media and on the internet.  Oftentimes patients don’t even fill their prescriptions due to their concerns. One of the myths is that statins lead to a premature decline in cognitive function and dementia.

This concern was addressed in the Journal of American College of Cardiology highlighting a study authored by Katherine Samaras, MBBS, PhD of St. Vincents Hospital in Sydney Australia.  They looked at adults aged 70 – 90 over a period of seven years.  Over 1,000 subjects in the study included individuals who did not take statins, individuals who were already using statins and individuals who were started on statins during the study period. The subjects first took a standard mini mental status test which allowed them to exclude anyone already showing signs of dementia. They then did state of the art cognitive testing and memory testing on the subjects over a seven-year period.

They found that there was no difference in the rate of decline of memory or intellectual function between statin users and non-users.  In a small subgroup of patients, they used imaging techniques to look at the brain volume comparing it over time between statin users and non-users. They found that users had more brain volume at the six-year mark than non-users.  They found that users with heart disease who took statins had a slower rate of decline of learning memory than non-users.  This also included users and non-users who have the APOE-4 genotype associated with cognitive decline.

While statins may not be a perfect class of drug, the study clearly demonstrated that the idea that they encourage cognitive decline and dementia at an accelerated rate is completely false.

Is TMAO the New LDL CHOLESTEROL?

Prevention of heart disease has centered on smoking cessation, controlling blood pressure, achieving an appropriate weight, regular exercise, control of blood sugar and control of your cholesterol.  Despite addressing and controlling these items individuals still have heart attacks and strokes and vascular events. Researchers are now directing their attention to a dietary metabolite of red meat called trimethlamine N-oxide or TMAO.

Recent peer reviewed and published studies have shown an association between high blood levels of TMAO and increased risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease.  A 2017 study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found a 60% increased risk of a major cardiovascular event and death from all causes in individuals with elevated TMAO.  Other research has linked high TMAO levels to heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

Our bodies make TMAO when choline and L-carnitine are metabolized by our gut bacteria in the microbiome. Red meat is particularly high in L-carnitine.  A study group at the Cleveland Clinic found that red meat raised the TMAO levels more than white meats or non-meat protein. They also discovered that red meat allowed more bacteria in the gut microbiome to be switched to producing TMAO. Of interest was the fact that the amount of fat in the food, particularly saturated fat, made no difference on the TMAO levels obtained.   Stanley Hazen, M.D. PhD, section head of preventive cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic, feels the TMAO pathway is “independent of the saturated fat story.”  The important issue to Dr Hazen is the presence of the gut bacteria to produce the TMAO from foods eaten.

Not all scientists buy into the TMAO theory of cardiovascular disease because of the relatively high level of TMAO found in many fish.  Some experts believe the beneficial effects of omega 3 fatty acids in fish offset the negative effects of TMAO. The leading researcher on TMAO says it is an evolving study and he is supported by experts who believe TMAO is “atherogenic, prothrombotic and inflammatory” per Kim Williams, M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

There is even a blood test to measure TMAO levels developed by the Cleveland Clinic and available through Quest Labs.  Do not get too excited about asking your physician to order it on your blood because it requires eliminating meat, poultry and fish plus other food items for several days in advance of the test.

For many years researchers at the Cleveland Clinic and Emory University recognized that 50% or more of heart attacks occurred in men who followed all the risk reduction guidelines including stopping smoking, controlling blood pressure and lipids, losing weight and getting active. Perhaps the answer as to why will be in the TMAO research and the solution will be changing the gut bacteria or their ability to convert L-carnitine to TMAO.