Haste Makes Waste in Meeting Core Measures

Affordable Care ActOnce again government regulators have put in place well-meaning rules without anticipating the consequences. We all hate sitting around in the Emergency Department waiting to be seen and to be treated. On October 15, 2014 as part of the new Affordable Health Care Act and the patient satisfaction portion, hospital ER’s will have about 180 minutes from the time you arrive and sign in to evaluate you , treat you and make a disposition or decision. The game starts on Oct. 15 but already hospital administrators have their systems operating to prepare to comply. If you fail to comply the hospital will be punished financially with fines and reductions in payments. Take the case of LH who is 88 years old, demented and lives with her loving and nurturing son in South Florida. She went to the beach with her son on a hot humid day in August with temperatures in the 90 degree range and humidity of almost 80 percent for a feels like temperature of 110. While she sat under an umbrella for several hours, the beers she drank to celebrate her birthday did not react well with her medications for dementia. She stood up and swooned to the ground and ended up in the ER. Labs, EKGs and Chest X Rays were done and it was decided that she was dehydrated. She was given some fluids and sent home. Two days later a urine culture obtained at that visit became positive indicating an excessive number of bacteria and she was placed on an oral antibiotic for ten days.

Six days later she was still feeling weak and shaking when she stood up and moved about. Her son took her back to the ER concerned that she was having seizures. She was evaluated by the ER staff and noted to be running a fever. A Chest X Ray was taken and was read as left lower lobe pneumonia by the radiologist without comparing it to her film six days prior. As I was finishing up with my last morning patient I received a phone call from the ER physician advising me that my patient was there with pneumonia and fever and required admission. He told me he had obtained blood and urine cultures and started her on Rocephin. I reminded him she was already on an antibiotic trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for a urinary tract infection. I told him I could be there in about 30 minutes and asked him to keep her in the ER until I got there. He said that was fine. To meet the Core Measures need for a quick disposition I suggested that the patient be admitted to a medical floor on my service, be given a clear liquid diet and I would take care of the rest. He said that was fine.

In August, Boca Raton, Florida is a sleepy seasonal vacation town enjoying the offseason quiet with its two colleges and seasonal visitors off on holiday. Restaurants are never full. There are no lines at the movies. There are few if any traffic jams and beds are readily available in the hospital. The hospital is usually 1/3 to ½ full at best. Our brand new emergency room is bright, wonderfully equipped with digital and manual blood pressure cuffs, otoscopes and opthalmoscopes at each bedside in marked contrast to the paucity of them on the hospital inpatient floors. It is always easier to be thorough and complete in your exam in the emergency department where you are not wasting time looking for equipment to examine the patient. I arrived at the ER in 40 minutes and was met by the icy stare of the staff nurse who said, “She has a bed upstairs can I send her?” My response was, “Not until I have a chance to take a history from her and her son and examine her.” While I was taking the history and doing the exam my cell phone went off. It was another physician in the ER department calling to talk to me about another patient who was in the department having been sent there by his surgical specialty physician who had just examined him in his office for a problem. I excused myself and walked toward another section of the ER when my patients nurse asked, “are you finished can I send her up?” I again declined and informed her that Dr L in the urgent care session wished to talk to me about a patient now and I would be back. My patient was not critically ill. Antibiotics, food and fluids had been ordered. Taking a short break to speak to the other ER doctor would not jeopardize her care or safety.

I returned 10 minutes later to learn that the nurse had called the Nurse Practitioner working with the hospitalist service and she had written admitting orders in my absence to speed the process along the way. In the hospital’s view the most important issues were to move the patients along, get the medication reconciliation form filled out and get the form on preventing phlebitis and use of anticoagulants filled out so they can meet their Core Measures goals. I went into the patient and son , completed my exam, explained my findings and disappeared into the physician computer room to enter orders, dictate the admission summary after I had reviewed the nurse practitioner’s orders, reviewed the chest x ray and all the lab data. The computerized orders revealed the patient had been admitted to a medical floor, on antibiotics, on heparin for phlebitis and pulmonary embolus protection. They had missed the fact that the patient had executed a “Do Not Resuscitate “form and her son had brought it with him. This was not recorded in the orders. They had also missed the fact that the pneumonia or left lower lobe consolidation they diagnosed was the same on the x ray from 6 days prior and another from one year prior. I walked over to the radiology reading room and pointed this out to the radiologist who said what was being called a pneumonia was actually an innocent long standing hiatal hernia appearing behind the heart on x ray. Despite not having pneumonia, the patient was sick, weak, and febrile and needed admission to sort it out. I sat down at the computer and spent thirty minutes on the orders and admission notes and then spoke to the patient and family. At that point I allowed the ER nurse to call the transporter and bring the patient up to the floor. The nurse literally scowled at me and told me I was violating their Core Measures policy and their director would not be happy and would want to talk to me. I told her I had another patient to see and that if her director wanted to talk to me they knew where to find me since I have been on staff for 35 years. I reminded her Core Measures criteria did not officially start for three more months and that with an empty ER she needed to take a deep breath, count to ten slowly and relax. My comments were not appreciated.

The next morning I arrived at the hospital and looked up the patient’s location. To my surprise despite requesting a medical bed for a “DNR” patient she had been located on the cardiology telemetry floor and was hooked up to a monitor measuring her heart rhythm. Why would I put a patient who asked not to be resuscitated, who was not having irregular beats, who did not have blood chemistries favoring the development of an arrhythmia on a cardiac monitor? The hospital gets paid a flat fee for her admission practically independent of how much service we deliver. I had no idea how this happened but realized that on the computerized order sheet even though it listed the bed as “medical” the nurse practitioner had ordered a cardiac monitoring bed. This flaw in our computer entry ordering system does not allow visitors to see the type of medical bed requested unless you know to click on it. The extra cost of the monitor approaches a $1000 per day. Her antibiotics for the pneumonia she doesn’t have also were quite costly. Yes the hospital expedited her trip to the floor to meet Core Measures but did so at the expense of making the wrong diagnosis, applying the wrong treatment and providing an expensive service the patient did not need. Haste makes waste. This is just the tip of the iceberg. On October 15th the best is yet to come. Pity the poor patients.

Haste Makes Waste in Meeting Core Measures

Obamacare v1Once again Government regulators have put in place well-meaning rules without anticipating the consequences. We all hate sitting around in the Emergency Department waiting to be seen and to be treated. On October 15, 2014 as part of the new Affordable Health Care Act and the patient satisfaction portion, hospital ER’s will have about 180 minutes from the time you arrive and sign in to evaluate you , treat you and make a disposition or decision. The game starts on Oct. 15 but already hospital administrators have their systems operating to prepare to comply. If you fail to comply the hospital will be punished financially with fines and reductions in payments. Take the case of LH who is 88 years old, demented and lives with her loving and nurturing son in South Florida. She went to the beach with her son on a hot humid day in August with temperatures in the 90 degree range and humidity of almost 80 percent for a feels like temperature of 110. While she sat under an umbrella for several hours, the beers she drank to celebrate her birthday did not react well with her medications for dementia. She stood up and swooned to the ground and ended up in the ER. Labs, EKGs and Chest X Rays were done and it was decided that she was dehydrated. She was given some fluids and sent home. Two days later a urine culture obtained at that visit became positive indicating an excessive number of bacteria and she was placed on an oral antibiotic for ten days.

Six days later she was still feeling weak and shaking when she stood up and moved about. Her son took her back to the ER concerned that she was having seizures. She was evaluated by the ER staff and noted to be running a fever. A Chest X Ray was taken and was read as left lower lobe pneumonia by the radiologist without comparing it to her film six days prior. As I was finishing up with my last morning patient I received a phone call from the ER physician advising me that my patient was there with pneumonia and fever and required admission. He told me he had obtained blood and urine cultures and started her on Rocephin. I reminded him she was already on an antibiotic trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for a urinary tract infection. I told him I could be there in about 30 minutes and asked him to keep her in the ER until I got there. He said that was fine. To meet the Core Measures need for a quick disposition I suggested that the patient be admitted to a medical floor on my service, be given a clear liquid diet and I would take care of the rest. He said that was fine.

In August, Boca Raton, Florida is a sleepy seasonal vacation town enjoying the offseason quiet with its two colleges and seasonal visitors off on holiday. Restaurants are never full. There are no lines at the movies. There are few if any traffic jams and beds are readily available in the hospital. The hospital is usually 1/3 to ½ full at best. Our brand new emergency room is bright, wonderfully equipped with digital and manual blood pressure cuffs, otoscopes and opthalmoscopes at each bedside in marked contrast to the paucity of them on the hospital inpatient floors. It is always easier to be thorough and complete in your exam in the emergency department where you are not wasting time looking for equipment to examine the patient. I arrived at the ER in 40 minutes and was met by the icy stare of the staff nurse who said, “She has a bed upstairs can I send her?” My response was, “Not until I have a chance to take a history from her and her son and examine her.” While I was taking the history and doing the exam my cell phone went off. It was another physician in the ER department calling to talk to me about another patient who was in the department having been sent there by his surgical specialty physician who had just examined him in his office for a problem. I excused myself and walked toward another section of the ER when my patients nurse asked, “are you finished can I send her up?” I again declined and informed her that Dr L in the urgent care session wished to talk to me about a patient now and I would be back. My patient was not critically ill. Antibiotics, food and fluids had been ordered. Taking a short break to speak to the other ER doctor would not jeopardize her care or safety.

I returned 10 minutes later to learn that the nurse had called the Nurse Practitioner working with the hospitalist service and she had written admitting orders in my absence to speed the process along the way. In the hospital’s view the most important issues were to move the patients along, get the medication reconciliation form filled out and get the form on preventing phlebitis and use of anticoagulants filled out so they can meet their Core Measures goals. I went into the patient and son , completed my exam, explained my findings and disappeared into the physician computer room to enter orders, dictate the admission summary after I had reviewed the nurse practitioner’s orders, reviewed the chest x ray and all the lab data. The computerized orders revealed the patient had been admitted to a medical floor, on antibiotics, on heparin for phlebitis and pulmonary embolus protection. They had missed the fact that the patient had executed a “Do Not Resuscitate “form and her son had brought it with him. This was not recorded in the orders. They had also missed the fact that the pneumonia or left lower lobe consolidation they diagnosed was the same on the x ray from 6 days prior and another from one year prior. I walked over to the radiology reading room and pointed this out to the radiologist who said what was being called a pneumonia was actually an innocent long standing hiatal hernia appearing behind the heart on x ray. Despite not having pneumonia, the patient was sick, weak, and febrile and needed admission to sort it out. I sat down at the computer and spent thirty minutes on the orders and admission notes and then spoke to the patient and family. At that point I allowed the ER nurse to call the transporter and bring the patient up to the floor. The nurse literally scowled at me and told me I was violating their Core Measures policy and their director would not be happy and would want to talk to me. I told her I had another patient to see and that if her director wanted to talk to me they knew where to find me since I have been on staff for 35 years. I reminded her Core Measures criteria did not officially start for three more months and that with an empty ER she needed to take a deep breath, count to ten slowly and relax. My comments were not appreciated.

The next morning I arrived at the hospital and looked up the patient’s location. To my surprise despite requesting a medical bed for a “DNR” patient she had been located on the cardiology telemetry floor and was hooked up to a monitor measuring her heart rhythm. Why would I put a patient who asked not to be resuscitated, who was not having irregular beats, who did not have blood chemistries favoring the development of an arrhythmia on a cardiac monitor? The hospital gets paid a flat fee for her admission practically independent of how much service we deliver. I had no idea how this happened but realized that on the computerized order sheet even though it listed the bed as “medical” the nurse practitioner had ordered a cardiac monitoring bed. This flaw in our computer entry ordering system does not allow visitors to see the type of medical bed requested unless you know to click on it. The extra cost of the monitor approaches a $1000 per day. Her antibiotics for the pneumonia she doesn’t have also were quite costly. Yes the hospital expedited her trip to the floor to meet Core Measures but did so at the expense of making the wrong diagnosis, applying the wrong treatment and providing an expensive service the patient did not need. Haste makes waste. This is just the tip of the iceberg. On October 15th the best is yet to come. Pity the poor patients.

Small Medical Practices Result in Fewer Hospital Admissions

Quantity-v-QualityThe American College of Physicians and the Affordable Care Act or “Obamacare”, are blatantly trying to make small independent medical practices obsolete. Under a barrage of rules, regulations and requirements all punishable by fines and or a reduction of payment for Medicare payments, the government is herding small practices into selling their practices to large hospital or health care systems. The goal is to provide more complete care in a paperless, seamless system of coordinated care. The American College of Physicians has gone as far as to aggressively push medical practices to become a Patient Centered Medical Home. This is all being done at the expense of mom and pop practices that have long term relationships with their patients but lack the resources to build and maintain the infrastructure that government and insurers demand from health care providers today.

It must have come as quite a shock to the ACP and the Center for Medicare Services (CMS) when a study published in Health Affairs and reviewed in the 08/21/2014 MedPage Today discussed a survey which showed that smaller primary care practices with fewer than 10 physicians had fewer preventable hospital admissions among their Medicare beneficiaries than larger practices.

The data was obtained between 2007 and 2009 and its publication produced the expected response from CMS and the ACP. They theorized that Patient Centered Medical Homes were just getting started and speculated that if the data from today was reviewed it would tell a different story. The problem is that when one looks at data from small medical practices, such as the data presented by the MDVIP concierge group from their small practices nationwide, you see exactly the same trend. Not only do the small practices hospitalize less but they score higher on quality measures designed by the government and insurers themselves.

The authors of the current study noted that 83.2% of US office based physicians are practicing in small practices of 10 or less physicians. Small practices in which physicians know their patients long term and are accessible and available clearly outperformed the larger health system and government sponsored mega groups.

Think about that the next time you look for a doctor. Which health care setting do you want your insurance plan to cover?

The Affordable Care Act – Choice Still Matters

Affordable Care ActThe Affordable Health Care Act (aka “ObamaCare”) has led to the purchase of physician practices as hospitals and health care systems organize narrow networks of health care providers to cash in on the influx of newly insured patients.  The insurers are contracting with the health systems at discounted rates to provide care. The insurers are requiring the newly insured to see physicians who are in their contracted network and sacrifice choice.  This week in an article published on the front pages of the NY Times insurance company executives were discussing how having a choice is over rated and unimportant. They are beginning to develop a public relations and marketing campaign to sell that idea to the public that having a choice of physicians to perform your surgery or radiation therapy is unimportant.

I have practiced adult medicine for 35 years now and let me, without reservation, tell you that is simply not true. My 85 year old golf and tennis playing patient survived replacement of two heart valves riddled with infection because he was sent to the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio where statistics show patients survive more often with fewer complications. I have three survivors of multiple myeloma treated at Dana Farber Cancer Center in Boston, University of Arkansas in Little Rock and Moffit Cancer Center in Tampa. I have scores of athletic seniors dancing and running and home from the hospital in 48 hours after having their hips replaced with the minimally invasive anterior approach by surgeons with 2000 or more of these under their belts rather than just a few. Then there are the lymphoma survivors from MD Anderson and Dana Farber Cancer Center who survived multi-drug treatment regimens at places that perform these services more frequently than other places.

Some physicians and medical centers are better than others. Some are the experienced researchers and teachers who show the rest of us how to handle difficult diseases so our patients can benefit from their experience.  Choice matters! Do not let your human resources person, employer or health insurance marketing guru sell you on price over choice. It will cost you or your loved one your life or your health if you do!

Medicare Payment Figures Released

Center for Medicare ServicesThe Center for Medicare Services (CMS) parent organization of the Medicare program, released detailed raw data showing how much providers of Medicare services are paid. For many years, hospitals and physician organizations have battled to keep this information private from the media, the public and private health insurance companies. As a citizen I have no problem with transparency, but if in fact we are asked to show our payments from Medicare then I believe every other individual and business
should be required to have their federal payments revealed to the public and media as well.

The data revealed that a physician in West Palm Beach, who treats diseases of the eyes in the elderly, received 21 million dollars from Medicare during the time period reviewed, leading the country in individual payments. That physician claims that most of the payment was for a drug called Lucentis injected into the eyes of seniors with macular degeneration a potentially sight ending disease. The problem is that other experts claim that a less expensive drug, injected into the eye produces equal or better results for far less cost. If the less expensive drug produces equal or better results then why is Medicare still paying for Lucentis, except in cases where the patient is allergic to the cheaper alternative or where it has not worked? CMS has the ability to control its payments for ineffective products. It just chooses not to do so. The NY Times made a big splash headline of the fact that this physician made a sizeable political contribution to a political party and then asked elected officials to look into why he was being singled out for repeated Medicare audits? Yes Medicare has the right to review each chart and determine if the treatment was indicated, if it was provided, if it was documented and then billed per their extensive rules and regulations. CMS makes the rules. If the physician follows those rules then it is inappropriate to slander him and accuse him and ask the tabloids to do what CMS could not do because the physician was in fact playing by their rules!

At the same time that CMS released this data, organized crime continues to profit from Medicare fraud in south Florida, particularly in Dade and Broward Counties because it is less risky to commit Medicare fraud than it is to run drugs, prostitution, human trafficking and loan sharking. Maybe CMS should be trying to stop the flow of low hanging criminal fraud rather than releasing data on provider payment. As the storm clouds gather over the use of this data, ObamaCare seems to have reached its enrollment goals despite major startup problems. Despite this, Kathleen Sebellius, the CMS director resigned. Do you think it had something to do with the inappropriateness of the payment data release and the ultimate consequences?

Pharmacies, Vaccinations and Health Benchmarking

The state legislature in Florida decided it is legal and appropriate for pharmacists and pharmacies to begin administering vaccines against multiple diseases.  Their list of adult vaccines includes seasonal flu shots, pneumovax (pneumonia vaccine) and zostavax (vaccine to prevent shingles).  The rationale of the legislature is that access to doctors to receive these preventive vaccines is limited and difficult.

By refusing to administer vaccines in their office because it is time consuming and not profitable enough, my colleagues in primary care have not made my argument against permitting this any stronger. I thought prevention and administering vaccines was part of the job description in primary care.  I am not asking my colleagues to lose money, but I do believe there is a distinct difference between not making a large profit and losing money.  Isn’t it our professional and ethical responsibility to provide preventive services?

Over the years, the fall season and start of the school year have always provided an opportunity to remind patients that they were due for an annual checkup and to make positive suggestions on what other opportunities were available for them to try and prevent infectious or chronic disease. School-age children have been required to receive immunizations before entering school for obvious public health reasons.  This provides an opportunity to benchmark their growth and age goals and discuss healthy living as well. The visits came towards the end of the calendar year when most individuals had met their annual medical deductible so the out of pocket costs were not great.

As I walk into my local CVS I am confronted by ads for vaccines and same-day clinics. They remind me that physicians have lost this encounter to enhance the doctor/patient relationship and provide sound health advice for the future because administering vaccines isn’t very profitable.  Pharmacies often use vaccinations as a loss-leader to draw you in and get you to purchase other, more profitable, items.

I will continue to provide vaccines in my internal medicine office as I believe it is the professional and responsible thing to do.

How Will Doctors Handle the Flood of Newly Insured Patients?

Albert Fuchs, MD notes in the online journal Medpage that in 2014 thirty million new patients will have health care insurance and will be seeking a doctor.  This will result from the institution of the Affordable Care Act passed in March of 2010.  Dr. Fuchs observes that there is a dramatic shortage of physicians to care for this increased patient load especially in the areas of general internal medicine, family practice and pediatrics.   He cites a study by the medical malpractice insurance company, The Doctors Company, which polled 5,000 physicians about the influx of new patients under the new law.  Sixty percent of the respondents said the large influx would “hurt the level of care they provide.”  Forty-three percent said they will retire in the next five years.   Nine out of 10 respondents said they would not encourage anyone they knew to enter the field of medicine.

Medical Economics published an article in which it said patients should not expect to see a physician. They accurately stated that medical schools cannot possibly produce the number of additional physicians needed in the time allotted.  Nurse practitioners will be elevated in the national healthcare dialogue.   They cited the Massachusetts experience in which many primary care doctors have closed their practices to new patients. An opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal predicted the closing of practices to new patients as well.

It is clear that your next “doctor” may be a nurse.  I have advised my younger family members to find themselves a good primary care physician. I recommend someone who is board certified or eligible in the specialty they are practicing. I also recommend that the physician follows you into the hospital if you require inpatient care, as opposed to turning your care over to a hospital based physician.  If post-hospital care is required, it’s preferred that your doctor will go to your rehab facility to provide care and continuity.  You should also seek a physician who provides same day appointments, when you are ill, and someone who is available and returns phone calls and emails and text messages the same day.

The Wall Street Journal predicted the growth of concierge medicine where patients pay an annual membership fee in exchange for a doctor being accessible.  The cost is about the same as a cup of coffee per day, at most nationally recognized coffee chains, and in many instances is less than one’s monthly cable TV bill.

Let’s face it, your health, which has a direct impact on your quality of life, is a much wiser investment than a daily double chocolate chip frapuccino or 489 cable television channels.