Men’s Sexual Function Tied to Statin Use

Statins v2Statin medication has been used for years to lower cholesterol and reduce an individual’s risk and chances of having a heart attack, a stroke or symptoms of peripheral arterial vascular disease. The “off label” uses of statins have been noted by many practitioners and researchers as well. The Bale and Doneen research team have for years believed that statins stabilize soft lipid plaque in the wall of blood vessels and reduce sudden heart attacks and strokes by reducing inflammation. At the American College of Cardiology meetings recently a paper was presented and appeared in the online version of the Journal of Sexual Medicine hinting that statins improved erectile dysfunction. John Kostis, MD, of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey said that statins improvement of erectile dysfunction was about 1/3 of what pills like Viagra, Levitra or Cialis can achieve but significantly better than placebo or life style improvements. He felt the improvement in erectile dysfunction was due to the medications lowering of lipid levels and to their improvement of the endothelial cells that line the inner walls of our blood vessels.

For many years erectile dysfunction was felt to be a marker for cardiovascular disease because it was felt that the ED reflected an inability to achieve adequate blood flow in the vascular tree of the genital organs. Testosterone, the male hormone, is a byproduct of cholesterol metabolism. It was originally felt that by lowering cholesterol you were indirectly lowering testosterone levels and this might affect your sexual performance. This study in 647 patients enrolled in 11 randomized studies with different statins would tend to reach a different conclusion that by lowering the lipids and maintaining the blood flow you can actually improve erectile function despite lowering the testosterone indirectly.

Dr. Kostis was quick to point out that statins should not be used as a sexual enhancing drug in men with normal or low cholesterol levels. He called for a larger study looking at multiple statins versus placebos and the current ED meds on the market.

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A Large Review Proves Statins Are Safe

StatinsThe online version of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcome published a review of the safety of statin drugs. The study looked at 135 randomized research trials including 246,955 participants. Medications examined included atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), simvastatin (Zocor), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and trials of pitavastatin.

They found there were no differences in the rates of discontinuation of the statins because of adverse events compared with discontinuation of placebo. The same applied to elevation of the muscle enzyme creatine kinase, muscle aches or myalgias and/or the development of cancer. As the doses of these medicines increased they found the participants reported more adverse effects.

Christie Ballantyne, MD of the Baylor College of Medicine reviewed the study for MedPage, the online journal of the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine, and felt the study certainly confirmed the tolerability of the statins as a class of drugs to lower cholesterol and reduce cardiovascular events. He reaffirmed the very small increased risk of statin use and developing Type II Diabetes and the need to monitor liver function blood tests while taking the drugs. He concluded these risks were well worth taking in view of the benefits to your health statins provided.

Statins May Reduce Your Energy Level

Beatrice A. Golomb, MD, PhD. of the University of California San Diego and colleagues discussed the results of their ongoing studies in the Archives of Internal Medicine online edition regarding cholesterol lowering drugs Simvastatin and Pravastatin and recipients’ perception of their energy level. Their research suggested that Simvastatin might leave its users, especially women, feeling tired and drained after exertion.  The scores hinted that almost 40% of women felt more tired and fatigued during physical activity on Simvastatin than without the lipid-lowering drug.

The trial included 1,016 men and women with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol screened at 115- 19- mg/dL who were randomized to receive 20 mg Simvastatin, 40 mg Pravastatin, or placebo each day for 6 months. These patients did not have documented heart disease, cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

There was a worsening of perceived energy level and exertion related fatigue in 4 of 10 women on Simvastatin. The effect was much less, and not significant, with Pravastatin or placebo.   In a recent review of statins and adverse effects in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, the authors pointed out that muscles performing work required  fats and lipids as a source of fuel and energy to work successfully. They hypothesized the possibility that the goals of cardiology to reduce lipid levels to prevent cardiovascular disease to extremely low levels may create an environment in working muscles where the lipid levels are too low to generate the fuel or energy needed to perform the exercise and work needed to be done.

Clearly, further research needs to be done.  We must remember all these participants DID NOT have vascular disease and this is a primary prevention study to prevent them from developing cardiovascular disease.  Might there be other methods to achieve this?  Is Simvastatin the only statin to cause this type of problem or will the other statins do the same?  Is this a problem of the particular generic brand of Simvastatin used or is it an across the board effect of Simvastatin?  All these questions require additional research to obtain the answers that we need.

Statins Reduce Risks, Even in the Lowest Risk Groups

Current guidelines for the use of statins in the USA (Lipitor, Zocor, Crestor, Atoravastatin, Simvastatin, Pravastatin, etc.) call for only treating individuals who have a ten-year risk of major vascular event of at least 20%.

European researchers including Borislava Mihaylova, MSc DPhil, and colleagues on the Cholesterol Treatment and Trialists Collaborators team writing in the Lancet question whether the guidelines should be changed to treat individuals with even lower risks. Their large Meta analysis suggests that statins provide substantial benefits for primary prevention – especially in patients with a 5-10% ten year risk of a major vascular event. They looked at data from 27 trials including over 175,000 participants. When they took into account cost and side effects of statins, such as muscle pain and inflammation, rhabdomyolysis, diabetes and hemorrhagic stroke, they concluded that the benefits still far outweighed the risks. They think that the clear-cut affect on lower risk individuals coupled with the fact that almost 50% of vascular events occur in patients without previous cardiovascular disease necessitates the broadening of USA guidelines for treatment of patients. The researchers go on to hypothesize that as more generic statins enter the market, cost concerns will become far less of a factor in the decision to treat or not treat.

They noted that for each 1 mmol/L reduction in LDL cholesterol, there was a 21% reduction in the relative risk of major vascular events, and all cause death, irrespective of age, baseline LDL or previous cardiovascular disease.

This research makes it clear that there is great value in assessing the statistical cardiovascular risk of each individual and being more aggressive in the use of statins than current national guidelines call for.  Incorporating risk tools such as the Framingham Risk assessment plus looking at newer techniques such as the measurement of carotid artery intimal thickness may be appropriate in the decision to choose a statin or not.