Irritable Bowel Syndrome Responds To Rifaximin

Abdomin v2In a study presented at annual meeting of The American College of Gastroenterology, Anthony Lembo, MD, of the Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, presented data that showed that the non-absorbable antibiotic Rifaximin helps control cramping and diarrhea related Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Irritable bowel cripples individuals by causing abdominal cramping and multiple loose or watery stools per day. These patients have been screened by colonoscopy and imaging studies for more serious diseases such as Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis with testing ruling these entities out. They are left with severe symptoms but no objective findings on available tests.

The study was comprised of 2,579 patients who received either Rifaximin or placebo three times per week. The decision to try an antibiotic was based on the theory that some IBS patients have excessive bacteria in the gut causing the problem. The treatment was successful in a significant number of participants compared to placebo based on a reduction of pain and frequency and number of stools. The patients were then observed for four weeks during which time some patients relapsed. If these patients were treated for another two weeks they showed significant improvement.

Irritable bowel incapacitates millions of individuals. While this data is extremely preliminary, it gives us hope of another treatment regimen, becoming available soon, that is effective and safe.

“Colonoscopies Are Overdone In The Entire Population.”

Current recommendations by the American College of Gastroenterology call for colonoscopy as a screening test for colon cancer beginning at age 50 for Caucasians and 45 years old for African Americans. If the initial test is negative, and you have no symptoms, the recommended interval for follow-up colonoscopy is 10 years.  Despite this, a recent study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine revealed that nearly half of the the Medicare patients with negative findings on colonoscopy underwent repeat exams much sooner than the guideline recommended interval of 10 years.

The study looked at 24,000 Medicare enrollees who had a negative colonoscopy from 2001 through 2003.  Forty six percent of these individuals had a repeat exam in less than seven years.  According to lead author James S. Goodwin, M.D. of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, there was “no clear indication for the early repeated examination “in just under half of the recipients.   He said that even in patients 80 years of age and older repeat exams were done within 7 years in 32.9 % of the study group even though these patients were much more likely to die of something other than colorectal cancer in the near future.

Goodwin and his associates were surprised by the frequency of the repeat colonoscopies since Medicare regulations preclude reimbursement for screening colonoscopy within 10 years of a negative examination result. Despite this, only 2% of the repeat exams were denied by Medicare and not paid.

Brooks Cash, M.D., chief of medicine at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD said, “I think colonoscopies are overdone in the entire population. “  He believes some of the frequent studies are provider driven and many are patient driven.

Colonoscopy is an invasive test with risks. The preparation can lead to fluid and electrolyte and volume problems in some individuals and the chance of a bowel perforation is rare but always present.  Patients need to talk to their personal physician about the need for a follow-up colonoscopy and the appropriateness of the timing suggested by the gastroenterologist before scheduling one.