Pneumococcal Vaccine in Development May Fight All Strains of the Disease

Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) plus other infections attributable to the Pneumococcus bacteria account for 15 million infections per year including pneumonia, meningitis and bronchitis. The organism is the leading cause of death in children less than five years old.  Over the last 30 years pharmaceutical companies have developed Pneumovax 23 which covers 23 unique bacteria that cause CAP in adults and Prevnair 13 which covers 13 pneumococcal bacterial strains.  Twelve of the bacteria in Prevnair 13 are identical to the Pneumovax 23 with only one unique bacterial type included.

A group at the State University of New York at Buffalo led by Blaine Pfeifer, specializing in chemical and bacterial engineering; has developed a new approach to pneumococcal vaccination. Working with computer modeling and animals to this point, they have developed a successful vaccine that attacks pathogenic pneumococcal bacteria while leaving the beneficial and non-pathogenic subtypes alone. The vaccine reads proteins on the surface of the bacterial cells and destroys only those that show aggressive activity. The vaccine has been 100% effective against the 12 most virulent pneumococcal bacterial strains existing in animal studies.    The vaccine is being prepared for human testing in the near future.  The preliminary work was discussed in the medical magazine Medical Economics

How Will Doctors Handle the Flood of Newly Insured Patients?

Albert Fuchs, MD notes in the online journal Medpage that in 2014 thirty million new patients will have health care insurance and will be seeking a doctor.  This will result from the institution of the Affordable Care Act passed in March of 2010.  Dr. Fuchs observes that there is a dramatic shortage of physicians to care for this increased patient load especially in the areas of general internal medicine, family practice and pediatrics.   He cites a study by the medical malpractice insurance company, The Doctors Company, which polled 5,000 physicians about the influx of new patients under the new law.  Sixty percent of the respondents said the large influx would “hurt the level of care they provide.”  Forty-three percent said they will retire in the next five years.   Nine out of 10 respondents said they would not encourage anyone they knew to enter the field of medicine.

Medical Economics published an article in which it said patients should not expect to see a physician. They accurately stated that medical schools cannot possibly produce the number of additional physicians needed in the time allotted.  Nurse practitioners will be elevated in the national healthcare dialogue.   They cited the Massachusetts experience in which many primary care doctors have closed their practices to new patients. An opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal predicted the closing of practices to new patients as well.

It is clear that your next “doctor” may be a nurse.  I have advised my younger family members to find themselves a good primary care physician. I recommend someone who is board certified or eligible in the specialty they are practicing. I also recommend that the physician follows you into the hospital if you require inpatient care, as opposed to turning your care over to a hospital based physician.  If post-hospital care is required, it’s preferred that your doctor will go to your rehab facility to provide care and continuity.  You should also seek a physician who provides same day appointments, when you are ill, and someone who is available and returns phone calls and emails and text messages the same day.

The Wall Street Journal predicted the growth of concierge medicine where patients pay an annual membership fee in exchange for a doctor being accessible.  The cost is about the same as a cup of coffee per day, at most nationally recognized coffee chains, and in many instances is less than one’s monthly cable TV bill.

Let’s face it, your health, which has a direct impact on your quality of life, is a much wiser investment than a daily double chocolate chip frapuccino or 489 cable television channels.