Red Meat May Not Increase The Risk For Vascular Disease But Is It Healthy?

A study published in the online version of Consultant 360 magazine looked at the relationship between eating red meat and cardiovascular risk factors. The study was performed at the Department of Nutrition Science at Purdue University. Researchers reviewed 24 studies on the topic listed on PubMed, Cocrane Library and Scopus databases. These studies examined individuals 19 years old or older who consumed at least 35 grams of red meat per day and whom listed at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor. They then examined the study participants blood total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides plus systolic and diastolic blood pressures.

They found that red meat at these quantities did not increase lipids, lipoproteins or blood pressure. This led them to conclude that the risk for cardiovascular disease did not increase in individuals consuming more than the recommended daily amount of red meat.

While this study gives hope to meat lovers, cardiovascular disease is not the only cause of illness or death. High consumption of red meat has been implicated in a greater risk of developing colon cancer, breast cancer, diabetes and an overall increased risk of death from all other causes. Some individuals seem to believe that you can counteract this negative effect of red meat by eating large quantities of fresh fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately a Swedish study published this year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition disproved this theory. For men, the more red meat they ate the more likely they were to develop diabetes. For both women and men, those who ate the most red meat had a 21% greater risk of all – cause mortality than those who ate the least. This higher risk did not change when the authors took into account fruit and vegetable intake. Interestingly it was processed meat that caused the rise in health risk with unprocessed meats only being associated with a slightly increased death risk even at high consumption levels.

I believe the take home advice is that consumption of unprocessed red meat in moderation with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables doesn’t impair your risk of dying. Processed meats are to be avoided if you wish to avoid multiple illnesses and disease. Give up the bologna and salami and other processed meat products except on limited occasions.

Water versus Diet Drinks for Dieting and Weight Loss

Water and many diet beverages quench your thirst and are listed as providing no energy or calories to your daily intake. With this in mind, researchers at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom set up a definitive study to assess the effect of water on weight loss after a meal versus a diet beverage’s effect on weight loss.

Ameneh Madjid, PharmD and associates looked at 81 overweight and obese women with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Members of the group were either asked to continue drinking diet beverages five times per week after lunch or substitute water for the diet beverages. The researchers found that over a 24 week period, the water group had greater decreases in weight, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin homeostasis and two hour post-meal glucose readings compared with the diet beverage group.

A similar study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looking at 89 obese women found that after six months the water group had lost an extra three pounds compared to the diet beverage group.

As a clinician, the idea of putting water into your body as opposed to diet drink chemicals makes great sense. There have been some researchers who felt that diet beverages eliminated calories in soft drinks but that users consumed more dietary food and calories when drinking diet beverages as opposed to water.

I will suggest to my patients that they try water instead of diet beverages but remind them that an occasional diet beverage probably will not hurt their long term goals.