Coffee Consumption Lowers Mortality Risk

The online edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine, July 11, 2017 edition published an article from MJ Gunter using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition that concluded that coffee consumption lowered patient mortality. The study looked at more than 520,000 patients from 10 different countries that were followed for 16.4 years. In a side study they looked at a group of 14, 800 patients and examined the correlation between coffee consumption and biomarkers of liver inflammation, function and health.

Patients who drank the most coffee had statistically significant lower all-cause mortality than individuals who did not consume coffee.  Patients in the highest group of coffee consumption tended to have significantly lower risk for mortality related to digestive diseases. Women coffee drinkers had a lower risk for cerebrovascular disease mortality and circulatory disease mortality but were at higher risk for ovarian cancer related mortality.

The researchers concluded, “Coffee drinking was associated with reduced risk for death from various causes.”

I will enjoy my coffee even more now. If only I could lay off the bagels and donuts that go with it.

Coffee Consumption May Lead to Safer Driving Trips

CoffeeIt is no secret that for decades men and women have been drinking caffeinated beverages to wake up or stay awake. This is especially pertinent when it comes to driving an auto or a truck and trying to stay alert and awake. Researchers in Australia decided to take a look at the question of whether ingesting caffeine in the form coffee or tea led to fewer accidents. Lisa Sharwood, PhD, of the University of Sydney reported in the British Medical Journal that long haul truckers who reported consuming caffeine to stay awake had a 63% reduced likelihood of crashing than control subjects. Their study looked at 530 long-haul truck drivers who had an accident between December 2008 and May 2011 in Australia. They compared them to 517 controls that had no accidents in the same 12 month period.

Case drivers drove about 1,700 miles in the week before their accident. Controls drove somewhat more, about 2,400 miles, in the week before their interview. 43% of the case drivers admitted to drinking caffeinated beverages specifically to stay awake. Only 3% admitted using illegal substances such as amphetamines or cocaine to stay awake.

The practical side of the study is that if you must operate a motor vehicle and you feel fatigued then stopping for a caffeine containing beverage definitely helps reduce the likelihood of a crash.

Drinking Coffee, Lower Mortality

Over the years, the consumption of coffee and its relationship to your health has been controversial.  In my medical school, internship, and training years in the late 1970‘s, it was thought that consuming more than five caffeinated beverages per day was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. That relationship has since been disproved.

The May 17th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine published a study on coffee drinking that will certainly make coffee drinkers more comfortable with a consuming a “cup of Joe.” They looked at a National Institute of Health – AARP study that began 1995 and includes almost 230,000 men and 173,000 women. They found that coffee drinking was associated with many negative behaviors including cigarette smoking, less exercise, eating more red meat, and eating less fresh fruits and vegetables.  Upon initially looking at the data, coffee drinking was associated with an increased mortality. However, when researches removed the negative behaviors from the data, and looked at the people who drank coffee but didn’t smoke and exercised; they found a significant drop in the mortality of coffee drinkers. Over 13 years, men who drank 4-5 cups of coffee per day had a risk reduction of 12% while women had a risk reduction of 16%.

The risk reduction was considered “modest” by Neal Freedman, PhD of the National Cancer Institute.  Lona Sandon, RD (registered dietitian) of the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas said, “Based on this study alone I would not tell people to start drinking more coffee to lower their risk of death.”   She felt individuals should “stop smoking, be more physically active, and eat fruits, veggies, whole grains and healthy fats…. A little coffee doesn’t appear to hurt.”  Cheryl Williams, RD, of Emory Heart and Vascular Center in Atlanta commented that “if you are not a coffee drinker, this study is not a good enough reason to start.”

The study seemed to show that with consumption of 4-5 cups of coffee per day your risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, injuries and accidents, diabetes and infections decreased. Coffee consumption did not appear to protect against cancer-related deaths. The design of the study does not allow us the luxury of saying drinking coffee is the “cause” of an “effect” of lowered overall mortality, but does certainly hint at it.

What is clear is that coffee drinking does not appear to have an adverse effect on already healthy lifestyles, but will not protect an individual from the detrimental effects of smoking, poor dietary choices and inactivity.