Chocolate and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

Chayakrit Krittanawong, MD, of the Baylor College of Medicine, was part of a group of physician scientists conducting an observational study involving regular chocolate consumption and the risk of developing coronary artery disease. Their research was recently published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. In what was called “a systematic review and meta-analysis” they analyzed data from 336, 289 participants, participating in six studies, looking at chocolate consumption, coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndrome and acute myocardial infarction.

If you consumed chocolate 3.5 times or more a month, or more than one time per week, you were considered a high chocolate consumer. High chocolate consumers turned out to have a lower risk of coronary artery disease of about 8%.

This is great news for chocolate lovers. However, readers must remember this is an observational study and cannot link cause and effect. It did not factor in obesity, lipid levels, presence of diabetes, cigarette smoking history, activity level, family history of premature coronary artery disease or other dietary habits.

Is it possible that chocolate lovers eat more fruits and vegetables than non-chocolate consumers? Could it be that chocolate lovers eat a healthy Mediterranean Diet more frequently than non-chocolate consumers?

This study clearly didn’t answer those questions. What it does say to me is that if you reduce your cardiovascular risk factors, as best you can, eating chocolate occasionally may not hurt.