A New Device To Protect the Brains of Athletes From Head Impact

As a parent of athletic girls who played competitive soccer and other sports that involved using your head to control a kicked or thrown ball, I always knew that studies of the brain of European professional soccer players showed much of the same brain injuries seen in professional boxers. We also saw several goalies diving to prevent a ball from entering the goal collide and hitting their heads with the goal’s metal side supports or with an opposing player. Several of the team parents and I tried to design a protective helmet for youth soccer but we never came up with anything that FIFA, the soccer world’s governing body, would allow to be worn during a game.

I played high school football, and a year in college, once suffering a concussion requiring an overnight hospital stay. Later in life as a physician I have followed the discovery of traumatic brain injuries and long-term permanent brain damage in football players, hockey players, soccer players and our military in combat. I wondered when the same creative humans who can send men to the moon and back would design items to protect the brains of competitive athletes.

Q30 Sports Science, LLC apparently has. They received FDA approval for their Q Collar which is designed to prevent deep tissue brain injury from head impacts. The Q Collar is already being marketed and used by athletes in Canada.

The Q Collar is a neck brace worn for up to four hours a day. It was designed after looking at woodpeckers head battering rams and trying to determine why, with all the head trauma they sustain, they do not develop CTE or other permanent traumatic brain injuries. Human brains are suspended in protective fluid inside a bony skull. The force of our head neck and shoulders colliding with a person or object allows our brains to slosh around unrestrained inside the skull and often hitting the extremely hard bony skull bones.

The Q collar increases the blood volume in our internal jugular veins causing a much tighter fit of the brain within the skull and preventing the movement or slosh. By reducing the movement of the brain within the skull it protects the brain from head impact injuries.

The collar was tested on a high school football team who wore state of the art football helmets plus an accelerometer which measured every impact the head sustained during play and practice. There were 284 participants with 139 athletes wearing the Q collar and 145 did not. Each athlete underwent a preseason specialized MRI study of the brain and a post season study. This allowed researchers to look to deep tissue brain injury that occurred over the course of that season. Significant changes were found in the deep tissue of brains on 106 of the 145 (73%) of the participants in the non-Q collar groups. No significant changes were found in 107 of 139 (77%) of the group who wore the Q collar.

The Q collar can be worn for four hours at a time and should be replaced every two years. No pricing data have been released but the intention is to sell the device directly to consumers. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke states that in any year there are 1.6 million to 3.8 million traumatic brain injuries related to competitive and recreational sports.

As a parent I would want my child to be wearing this type of device when they engaged in sports that had head impact injuries as a potential side effect. It will remain to be seen just how effective this type of device will be in other recreational activities such as skiing, snowboarding, biking, riding scooters or skating and; will it have an impact in the military on blast injuries? Will insurance companies require such a device for contact sports?