American Diabetes Association: Fish Oils Do Not Reduce Cardiovascular Event Risk

The American College of Cardiology now recommends that individuals take “fish oil” supplements in pill form to prevent coronary artery and vascular disease. The scientist who discovered that fish oils may have beneficial effects has publically come out and let it be known that he feels differently on the subject. While he once advocated eating two fleshy cold water fish meals a week to gain some degree of protection, he has most recently reduced that requirement to two meals a month. He has additionally scolded the nutritional supplement community for the promotion of fish oils in pill form when it can be safely and effectively obtained by eating a few cans of tuna fish or salmon per month.

Recently, at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, Jackie Bosch, MSc, from McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences in Hamilton, Ontario presented data that suggested that fish oils did not reduce cardiovascular deaths or events.  The data was abstracted from the ongoing ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) study of 12,536 patients with type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose levels or impaired glucose tolerance. These study participants were composed of 65% men with a mean study age of 64 years who were followed for over six years. The study group received one gram daily of n-3-fatty acids.

The data showed that fish oils did not make a difference in the number of fatal or non-fatal heart attacks, fatal and non-fatal strokes, hospitalizations for heart failure, revascularization procedure numbers, and loss of a limb or digit due to poor circulation for any cardiovascular cause. The study additionally showed that the use of a long-acting insulin Glargine had no detrimental or beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease.  The story was covered and summarized in the online periodical of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, MedPage.  Interestingly, the placebo group received one gram per day of olive oil.

Clearly this is another indictment against taking pills instead of acquiring nutrients in a well prepared balanced diet that includes cold water fleshy fish weekly.  Upon reading the study, I wondered if the use of olive oil by the placebo group was cardio-protective and fish oils were just no more cardio-protective than olive oil?  Once again, further research is needed. While the research is ongoing, eating cold water fleshy fish once a week as part of a nutritionally sound, well prepared diet rather than taking fish oil pills seems to make sense.

Dutch Diet Drink Reduces Hunger

Obesity is an epidemic negatively impacting our health in America and around the world.  According to the National Center for Health Statistics, over 68% of American adults are overweight or obese.  As we move away from a hard working agrarian society to a society which consumes fast food while getting less activity due, in part, to our technological advances, we are always looking for aids to keep our weight down.

In recent years the pharmacological approach has fallen on hard times due to the many significant side effects associated with diet medications.  Expensive surgery to reduce the stomach size and re-route the intestines has met with mixed success, high costs and adverse effects as well.

Last month, Harry Peters, a research manager of Unilever Research and Development in the Netherlands announced preliminary successful results of a prototype diet beverage. He and his staff concocted a chocolate flavored brew that stayed liquid and palatable when you drank it but firmed up into a thick gel when exposed to the acidic and digestive juices in the stomach.  The gel distended the stomach and produced a sense of satiety and fullness with a resultant decrease in appetite in the vast majority of the study participants. The research is quite preliminary but again presents hope to those of us fighting the battle of the bulge.

“Although the self-reported decreases in hunger are robustly reported in this study, further studies are needed to establish its implications for food intake, compliance to weight loss programs and long-term effects on weight loss or weight maintenance,” Peters and colleagues concluded.

Reducing Triglyceride Levels

The American Heart Association along with Michael Miller, M.D., director for the Center for Preventive Cardiology at the University of Maryland – School of Medicine in Baltimore, just released data and recommendations that diet and lifestyle changes alone should be sufficient to reduce elevated triglyceride levels.

The researchers analyzed more than 500 international studies conducted over the last 30 years for the purpose of updating doctors on the role of triglycerides in the evaluation and management of cardiovascular disease risks. The study confirmed that triglycerides are not directly atherogenic but are instead a marker of cardiovascular disease risk.  High triglycerides are commonly seen in diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease and certain disorders associated with HIV disease. Alcohol and obesity plus inactivity all contribute to elevated levels with TG levels rising markedly in this country since the mid 1970’s in concert with the obesity epidemic we are now seeing.

Triglycerides are checked on a fasting blood test of optimally 12 hours with the upper limit of normal set at 150mg/dl. Newer recommendations will reduce the level to 100 mg/dl.  If your triglycerides are elevated the study made the following suggestions to lower them to appropriate levels:

  1. Limit your sugar intake to less than 5% of calories consumed with no more than 100 calories per day from sugar for women and no more than 150 calories per day from sugar for men.
  2. Limit Fructose from naturally occurring foods and processed foods to less than 50 -100 grams per day
  3. Limit saturated fats to less than 7% of total calories
  4. Limit trans-fat to less than 1% of total calories.

Elevated triglycerides, especially above 500 mg/dl, are associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis. For individuals with TG levels this high we recommend complete abstinence from alcohol.

Exercise is necessary to lose weight and lower triglyceride levels as well. Physical activity of a moderate level such as brisk walking for at least 150 minutes per week (2.5 hours) can lower your triglycerides another 20-30%.

If lifestyle changes including diet modifications and aggressive exercise do not bring you to target levels we suggest the addition of marine based omega 3 products. Also, eat fleshy cold water fish!

A combination of dietary changes, moderate regular exercise and weight reduction is all that is needed to control most problems with triglycerides.  Referrals to registered dietitians can be very helpful in assisting you with the dietary changes required to be successful.