Honey May Be Effective at Killing Bacteria and Thwarting Antibiotic Resistance

I have on many occasions advised my patient’s ill with an upper respiratory infection and a cough to try some tea and honey. The recommendation is based on family suggestions bridging generations plus practical experience in noting its therapeutic effect when I have a cold and cough.  Of course in today’s world of randomized double blinded objective research studies it is nice to have some evidence to back the recommendation up.

Pri-Med released a summary of a study done at the University of Wales Institute Cardiff which shows the benefits of Manuka honey.  The honey is made from the nectar collected by bees from the Manuka tree in New Zealand. This honey apparently can hamper the ability of pathogenic streptococci and pseudomonas from attaching to tissue. This is an essential step in the initiation of acute infections.

Lead author Rose Cooper additionally pointed out that Manuka honey was effective at making Methicillin Resistant Staph Aureus “more susceptible to the antibiotic Oxacillin.” Methicillin resistant staph aureus is resistant to drugs like Methicillin and Oxacillin. They do not improve or cure the infection. If you add honey, the infections are now showing a response to Oxacillin .

This is very clearly early data with more studies needed. It will not prevent me from continuing to extol the virtues of tea and honey, as well as chicken soup, as part of the treatment of a viral or bacterial upper respiratory infection.