American Diabetes Association: Fish Oils Do Not Reduce Cardiovascular Event Risk

The American College of Cardiology now recommends that individuals take “fish oil” supplements in pill form to prevent coronary artery and vascular disease. The scientist who discovered that fish oils may have beneficial effects has publically come out and let it be known that he feels differently on the subject. While he once advocated eating two fleshy cold water fish meals a week to gain some degree of protection, he has most recently reduced that requirement to two meals a month. He has additionally scolded the nutritional supplement community for the promotion of fish oils in pill form when it can be safely and effectively obtained by eating a few cans of tuna fish or salmon per month.

Recently, at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association, Jackie Bosch, MSc, from McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences in Hamilton, Ontario presented data that suggested that fish oils did not reduce cardiovascular deaths or events.  The data was abstracted from the ongoing ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) study of 12,536 patients with type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose levels or impaired glucose tolerance. These study participants were composed of 65% men with a mean study age of 64 years who were followed for over six years. The study group received one gram daily of n-3-fatty acids.

The data showed that fish oils did not make a difference in the number of fatal or non-fatal heart attacks, fatal and non-fatal strokes, hospitalizations for heart failure, revascularization procedure numbers, and loss of a limb or digit due to poor circulation for any cardiovascular cause. The study additionally showed that the use of a long-acting insulin Glargine had no detrimental or beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease.  The story was covered and summarized in the online periodical of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, MedPage.  Interestingly, the placebo group received one gram per day of olive oil.

Clearly this is another indictment against taking pills instead of acquiring nutrients in a well prepared balanced diet that includes cold water fleshy fish weekly.  Upon reading the study, I wondered if the use of olive oil by the placebo group was cardio-protective and fish oils were just no more cardio-protective than olive oil?  Once again, further research is needed. While the research is ongoing, eating cold water fleshy fish once a week as part of a nutritionally sound, well prepared diet rather than taking fish oil pills seems to make sense.