Controlled Substances and Schedule Drugs

The right to prescribe narcotics and controlled substances is regulated by the Federal Government. Physicians, dentists and health care providers apply for licensing with the Drug Enforcement Agency and request the right to prescribe medication from the different “schedules.” State legislatures and state medical boards regulate this further. Most people are unaware which medications and drugs are in which schedules or categories.

Schedule I – For the most part, these are substances which have no current accepted medical usage and are easily abused.

Examples are: Heroin, LSD, Ecstasy (methylenedioxymethamphetamine), Quaaludes          (methaqualone) and peyote.

Schedule II – These are substances with high potential for abuse with a risk of physical and psychological dependence.

Examples are: Vicodin, cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, Ritalin

Schedule III – these are drugs with moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence.

Examples are: Products with < 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit such as Tylenol with codeine, ketamine, anabolic steroids and testosterone.

Schedule IV – These are drugs with a lesser risk for abuse and dependence.

Examples are: – Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, and AmbienTramadol.

Schedule V drugs have lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV drugs and contain limited amounts of narcotics. This would include antidiarrheal medications, antitussives, and mild analgesics. Cough medications with less than 200 milligrams of codeine per 100 milliliters such as Robitussin AC, Lomotil, Lyrica and Parapectolin.

All the medications on these schedules must be reported to E-Forcse, the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, within 24 hours of dispensing by pharmacies. They all require the prescribing doctor to check E-FORSCE before prescribing.

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