Doctors of Pharmacy and Their Role in the Health Care Team

My patient, a mental health professional, was sent for an MRI of her hips and back by her orthopedic surgeon. He was in surgery when she called him for an antianxiety medication to help her get through her claustrophobia in the MRI machine.

She waited seven hours for a response and when a repeat phone call resulted in no response she called me. I asked her if she was driving herself to or from the procedure and she answered no that her husband was taking her. I phoned in a small supply of a longer acting antianxiety medication called lorazepam 0.5 mg one tablet 30 minutes prior to the procedure. It was called in at 4:00 p.m. after we first accessed the in-state narcotic prescribing line Eforsce to make sure our patient was not pill or doctor shopping.

I received a phone call at 9:00 p.m. that evening from the patient who was at the pharmacy saying they didn’t have lorazepam in stock. It was unclear to me why, if they did not have the medication in stock, no one was responsible enough to call me and request an alternative prescription? I called the pharmacy in response to the patient calling me and ordered another product. However, they did not respond to my question “Why didn’t you call me if the medicine I ordered was not available?”

This week a 63 year old woman with three days of painful urination came to my office. Her urine suggested an infection. I called her pharmacy to phone in a prescription for ampicillin until her culture and sensitivity results were known. The pharmacist said she was too busy to take the call and asked me to leave a message. I waited for the beep and left the message. Thirty six hours later I received a fax to my office telling me that they were out of ampicillin and did not offer an alternative. I immediately called the pharmacy, furious at the delay and prescribed an alternative medication. Once again, if they did not have the ampicillin then why did it take them 36 hours to inform the patient or me? Why was this done by facsimile and not a phone call? The potential for complications of an untreated gram negative urine infection is frightening and life threatening. This should never occur. Then again why isn’t a common inexpensive antibiotic available in South Florida?

This is not very different than the blood pressure medicine Valsartan recall due to production induced impurities. When the recall was announced, I searched my computer and contacted my patients taking this medication to discuss options. For those demented and cognitively impaired patients I first called the pharmacy to ask if their supply was part of the recall. Much to my surprise much of it was under recall but the pharmacy had no intention and felt no professional responsibility to inform the customers who they had sold the tainted product to.

Pharmacists continually stress their professionalism as part of the health care team. These are three recent local examples of their need for improvement.

Advertisements