PPI Use and Death Risk

In recent weeks we have seen articles linking the long term use of proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium (esomeprazole), Protonix ( Pantoprazole), Aciphex (Rabeprazole), Prilosec ( Omeprazole) with an increased risk of community acquired pneumonia, kidney disease, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and increased risk of clostridia difficile infection (antibiotic related colitis). These drugs are commonly used short-term for the treatment of ulcers, gastro esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s Esophagus, upper GI bleeding and H Pylori infections.

Often, after the prescribed treatment period, physicians try to discontinue the use of PPI’s but the patients have a return of their symptoms. With these medications now being sold over the counter, it is very difficult to get a symptomatic individual to curtail therapy even if the long-term risk is daunting.

I often attempt to switch patients to “old fashioned” antacids such as Tums, Rolaids, Mylanta, Gaviscon or even the H2 receptor blockers such as Tagamet and Zantac (Cimetidine and Ranitidine). All too frequently the response is that “my symptoms returned and only get better with the PPI.”

A study published in the British Medical Journal looked at data from the Veterans Administration data base for a period of two years, and selected a representative group of PPI users and non-users. They then followed them for 7-8 years.

Patients taking PPI drugs regularly had a 25% increased risk of death. There was no apparent reason why these medications led to a higher death risk. Further studies will be needed. The conclusion is take them for as short a period of time as possible.

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