Smoking Increases the Risk of Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer and Colon Cancer in Women

The Surgeon General of the United States issued another report on the dangers of smoking and its addictive potential last year.  At the time of release I was quite skeptical about the cost of the report and the need to remind Americans again that smoking is dangerous for you.  Then along comes a detailed review of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project. According to Stephanie Land, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh, long-time smokers had a 59% increase in the risk of invasive breast cancer compared with nonsmokers.  The study looked at the links between four types of malignancy: breast, lung, colon, and endometrial cancer with smoking, alcohol use and leisure time activity.  The findings suggested that:

1.       Women who had smoked between 15 and 35 years had a 35% increase in the risk of breast cancer compared to non smokers. In that same group, if a woman smoked more than a pack a day she had a five – fold higher risk than non smokers.

2.       Women who had smoked 35 years or more had a 59% increase in the risk of breast cancer. These long-term smokers had a 30 times higher risk of lung cancer than non smokers.

3.       The risk of colon cancer among long–term smokers was five times higher than among non smokers.  A drink of alcohol a day reduced the risk of colon cancer by 65% compared to non drinkers.

4.       Inactive women had a 72% increased risk of uterine endometrial cancer compared to active participants in the study.

The study of almost 14,000 women highlighted the benefits of improving life style choices.  While researchers search for drugs and medication to prevent these life threatening illnesses, the study pointed out the benefits of altering the life style choices of women to prevent the development of cancer.

It is clear that smoking prevention and smoking cessation programs can do far more to prevent these cancers than pharmaceuticals. With cutbacks on funding for public health and the elimination of most health and hygiene classes in middle schools and high schools due to financial constraints, I wonder if we are being penny wise and pound foolish.