It’s Only a Cold …

As a concierge medical practice we pride ourselves on being available to help our patients with access to the doctor by phone and same day appointments. At this time of year we are faced with daily phone calls regarding cold or flu like symptoms.  Thus, I thought it appropriate to share some topical information which should be useful in helping anyone decide whether they should “ride out the storm” or give their doctor a call.

There are at least 1,500 different known viruses that lead to a viral upper respiratory tract infection sometimes known as “the common cold”.   With these, a high sustained fever of 101 degrees Fahrenheit is rare.  Aches and pains, nasal discharge with runny nose and post nasal drip are common. Dry cough advancing to a barking cough productive of clear, yellow and often greenish phlegm is common as well.  You’ll most likely feel miserable. Your sinus and head congestion make you feel like you are in a tunnel, a sound chamber, or wearing a deep sea diving helmet. Your appetite waxes and wanes. You are exhausted with the activities of daily living.  Getting out of bed to wash your face and groom yourself may seem as challenging as a 26.5 mile race up a hill.

Currently, there is no cure for the common cold. Antibiotics do not work.  A “Z Pack “does not speed up the process. An injection of antibiotic does not make it go away faster. The infection could care less if you have a high school reunion to go to in Philadelphia, a grandchild’s bar mitzvah or baptism, or a flight to Paris for a combined work/pleasure excursion. Frankly, once you have this type of viral infection you will most likely have to ride out the storm.

Furthermore, going to the ER and sitting and waiting to be seen doesn’t make the infection go away quicker. Paying for a visit at a walk in center or urgent care center where you are more likely to negotiate successfully for an unwarranted or needed antibiotic will not help either.

In most instances, your recovery from the virus will take 7-14 days providing you drink plenty of warm fluids, rest when you are tired and use common sense. Cough medicine may ease the cough. Saline nasal solution may clear the nasal congestion. Judicious use of a nasal decongestant under your physician’s supervision may help as well.  It will take time. You are contagious. No you should not go to the gym if you are feeling poorly. Chicken soup, tincture of time, hot tea with honey, plenty of rest and common sense are recommended remedies.

If at any point you still feel you have the plague, dengue fever, the bird flu or the Ebola virus come on in. We will take a look, evaluate your symptoms and likely tell you, “It’s a cold.”

Honey May Be Effective at Killing Bacteria and Thwarting Antibiotic Resistance

I have on many occasions advised my patient’s ill with an upper respiratory infection and a cough to try some tea and honey. The recommendation is based on family suggestions bridging generations plus practical experience in noting its therapeutic effect when I have a cold and cough.  Of course in today’s world of randomized double blinded objective research studies it is nice to have some evidence to back the recommendation up.

Pri-Med released a summary of a study done at the University of Wales Institute Cardiff which shows the benefits of Manuka honey.  The honey is made from the nectar collected by bees from the Manuka tree in New Zealand. This honey apparently can hamper the ability of pathogenic streptococci and pseudomonas from attaching to tissue. This is an essential step in the initiation of acute infections.

Lead author Rose Cooper additionally pointed out that Manuka honey was effective at making Methicillin Resistant Staph Aureus “more susceptible to the antibiotic Oxacillin.” Methicillin resistant staph aureus is resistant to drugs like Methicillin and Oxacillin. They do not improve or cure the infection. If you add honey, the infections are now showing a response to Oxacillin .

This is very clearly early data with more studies needed. It will not prevent me from continuing to extol the virtues of tea and honey, as well as chicken soup, as part of the treatment of a viral or bacterial upper respiratory infection.