Office Hours, After Hours Phone Calls, E-Mail Communications

For clarity purposes, my office is open at 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday with staff present. The practice does not close for lunch. The telephone lines are open from 8:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

During normal business hours please call the office phone number rather than my cell phone number. My staff will answer the call and bring it to my attention immediately if it is an emergency, or in-between patients if it is not an emergency. Please know there may be times when a consulting physician or hospital nurse may call the doctor’s cell phone directly during your visit. I recognize this may be an inconvenience and will be as efficient as possible while on the call.

If you call before 8:00 a.m. or after 4:30 p.m. the calls are forwarded to my cell phone number if you choose option #2 when listening to the voice message. There is also an option to leave a message.

When calling my cell phone, I will answer immediately if possible. Otherwise, I will return your call within 30 minutes. If you do not receive a return phone call within 30 minutes please call back. There are areas in hospitals and the community that do not have adequate cell phone service so I may not have received your initial call.

If you are having a medical emergency (e.g., heart attack, stroke, major loss of blood, loss of consciousness, breathing difficulty or intractable pain etc.) call 911 immediately and if possible then notify me.

When feeling ill, sick or there is a change in your condition; please call 561.368.0191 rather than sending an email to inform us of the problem. Email communications do not meet Federal privacy law standards.

If your work hours or personal schedule are such that the normal business hours don’t work for you, please call my office manager, Judi Stanich, so we can make arrangements to accommodate your schedule.

Because I have to visit my hospitalized patients during the early morning, I am typically unable to offer appointments prior to 8:00 a.m.

Although I provide 24×7 direct access, you should use discretion when calling me outside of normal office hours. Generally, after hours calls should be when you have a real health concern or an emergency.

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Inflammation and Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

For years, experts have noted that up to 50% of men who have a heart attack do not have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, do not smoke and are active. This has led to an exploration of other causes and risk factors of cardiac and cerebrovascular disease.

In recent years, studies have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in untreated psoriatic arthritis and in severe psoriasis. We can also add atopic eczema to the list of cardiovascular risk factors.

In a publication in the British Medical Journal, investigators noted that patients with severe atopic eczema had a 20% increase risk in stroke, 40 – 50% increase risk of a heart attack, unstable angina, atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular death. There was a 70% increased risk of heart failure. The longer the skin condition remained active the higher their risks.

The study looked at almost 380,000 patients over at least a 5 year period and their outcomes were compared to almost 1.5 million controls without the skin conditions. Data came from a review of medical records and insurance information in the United Kingdom.

It’s clear that severe inflammatory conditions including skin conditions put patients at increased risk. It remains to be seen whether aggressive treatment of the skin conditions with immune modulators and medications to reduce inflammation will reduce the risks?

It will be additionally interesting to see what modalities cardiologists on each side of the Atlantic suggest we should employ for detection and with what frequency? Will it be exercise stress testing or checking coronary artery calcification or even CT coronary artery angiograms? Statins have been used to reduce inflammation by some cardiologists even in patients with reasonable lipid levels? Should we be prescribing statins in men and women with these inflammatory skin and joint conditions but normal lipid patterns?

The correlation of inflammatory situations with increased risk of vascular disease currently raises more questions with few answers at the present time.

Bureaucracy, High-tech and a Day Rounding at the Hospital

We have a new electronic medical health record system at our hospital. It was introduced with what I believe is a short and ineffective training program for physicians followed by a far too short on-location use of experts to help the doctors and nurses learn the new system. It is frankly a pain in the neck to access the computer from outside the hospital due to the multiple layers of security and passwords you must use. It is simpler and less complicated at the hospital but the request for frequent change of the password for security purposes makes remembering the password problematic for me especially when I am sitting in the ER at 2:00 a.m. sleep deprived and wanting to get home.

On an average day the computer adds a minimum of 10 minutes of work per patient seen. We have electronic health records to comply with the massive number of Federal mandates requiring it and; to avoid the financial penalties for not complying. The Feds offered each hospital an 11 million dollar incentive for putting in these systems which made their decision to computerize far simpler.

Recently, when I made rounds and attempted to access the computer, a brand new screen greeted me. On the left-hand side it instructed me to tap my ID badge against the screen for an automatic log in access. On the right-hand side was the traditional log in screen.

I must be fair and admit the hospital did notify staff to stop by the Medical Staff Office to be issued a new ID badge which would provide easy access to the system. Since that office opens at 8:00 a.m., and I am usually there earlier than that, I had not yet picked up my new badge. So I used the right-hand side of the screen and accessed it the traditional way typing in my User ID and current password. A swirling circle appeared and swirled for three minutes. Then another screen appeared for two minutes. By this time I was annoyed and frustrated.  A kind nurse noticed my frustration and told me that when you attempt to log into the new screen the first time, it takes about 10 minutes to be logged onto the system. I sat patiently until finally I was let in.

The delay in access pushed me back 10 minutes.  By the time I finished rounds it was 8:00 a.m. I stopped by the Medical Staff Office on the way to my office and asked for my new ID card. I also asked if I could keep my old ID card as well because over the last 40 years I had become attached to it. We needed that ID card to swipe our way into the parking lot, into the building and onto the elevators and certain hospital floors and units.

I was told I needed to keep my old ID card as my new card was to be used only for computer access. It would not get me into the parking lot or the building or special floors and units. They gave me a fancy new ID card holder that accommodates two ID cards.

That’s the high-tech world’s idea of efficiency and progress – I suppose!

Concierge Medicine – My 15th Anniversary

I practiced general internal medicine from June 1979 until November 2003. Immediately after training I became an employed physician of an older internist covering my employer’s patients and building my practice for two years before embarking on my own.

I saw 20 or more patients per day in addition to providing hospital care and visiting patients as they recovered in nursing homes. As managed care made its clout felt by kidnapping our patient’s and trying to sell them back to us at 50 cents on the dollar, I helped form a 44 doctor multi-specialty group with its own lab, imaging center and after hours walk-in center. The hope was that a large group might have some negotiating leverage with insurers allowing us to take more time with our patients for more reasonable fees. They laughed at us.

Three years later, my associate and I went to the bank, took out a big personal loan and started our concierge practice. We did this primarily to be comfortable providing excellent care to patients. The system was broken and no medical leader, insurer, employer or politician was going to fix the broken system.

Year after year as our patient’s survived and grew older and more complicated, private insurers including CMS (Medicare) asked us to see them quicker, in shorter visits, but be more comprehensive. The insurers essentially wanted us to place a square peg in a round hole. Switching to a Concierge practice meant I would be caring for a small group of patient’s well at the cost of finding a new medical home for 2,200 existing patients. Switching to Concierge Medicine was our response to a broken system being pushed in a direction of more money and profits for administrators and insurers at the expense of patients and doctors.

In retrospect, I should have made this change five years sooner. The financial rewards are not very different – caring for a small patient panel that pay a membership fee as compared to an enormous panel of patients. The rewards to the patients’ and the doctor for doing a job well done are priceless.

We increased our visit time to 45 minutes from 10 minutes. We set aside 90 minutes for new patient visits. We made a point of continuing to care for our hospitalized patients while all our colleagues were turning that over to hospital employed physicians with no office practices. We provided same day visits and access to the doctor 24 hours a day, seven day a week with accessibility by phone or email. We had the time to advocate for our patient’s as they weaved their way through a bureaucratic mind numbing health care system that made filling a prescription as difficult as the science of launching a rocket into space.

The results of the change are striking. There are very few emergency admissions to the hospital. Falls and trauma, which are mostly not preventable, replaced heart attacks, strokes and abdominal catastrophes as reasons for hospitalizations. There are many fewer hospitalizations. There are fewer crises because we learn about the problems immediately and see the patient’s quickly. If necessary, we help them get access to specialty services.

We have the time and staff now to battle with insurers and third party administrators to get our patient’s what they need to regain their health and independence. When they need specialty care we get them the best; the people we go to ourselves both locally and nationally. We send them equipped with all the information and questions they need to ask about their health problem.

Concierge Medicine has additionally given us the time to teach future doctors. While this stewardship of the profession and launching of future physicians is immensely satisfying, it also makes us stay current and on top of the latest literature and advances.

I look forward to this coming celebration of my 15th year in concierge medicine. I see Direct Pay Practices developing which deliver concierge services to the masses for lower fees. It is a spin-off of “boutique “medicine” or Concierge Lite” as my advisor calls it. It is an attempt by young physicians to reestablish the doctor patient relationship and deliver care in a broken health system.

I am thankful to my patients, who took a chance and came on this journey with me. I look forward to caring for them for years to come.

Cannabis & Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Chronic Non-Cancer Pain

My 90 year old patient with spinal stenosis, diffuse osteoarthritis and now polycythemia vera was in for an office visit. He had been to see his hematologist and had been phlebotomized removing a unit of blood to control his overproducing bone marrow. He mentioned that the hematologist had sent him to a medical marijuana clinic run by a pain physician colleague of his.

The patient proudly showed me his marijuana registration license. “It doesn’t work you know. In fact I feel poorly after I take some. I have tried the oils and some edibles but it really doesn’t affect my pain in a positive way.”

Many of my patients now are licensed to receive medical marijuana for chronic pain. It’s a big business here in the state of Florida where senior citizens with chronic aches and pains are always looking for that magical pill to restore their vitality and youthfulness. His experience is unfortunately supported in the medical literature. In the May 25, 2018 issue of Pain magazine which looked at the pain relief of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain and 48 other non-cancer pain conditions. The study was a literature review looking at the 104 studies published on this subject.

The findings were sobering and disappointing. They found that cannabinoids had no appreciable positive impact on pain relief. In addition it didn’t help sleep, there was no positive impression of change and there was no significant impact upon physical or emotional functioning.

I am not an anti-marijuana crusader. I see its positive impact in treating glaucoma. I see the studies citing it is more effective to deliver by smoking it than eating it or taking it in pill form.

The review studies included all forms of administration of cannabis. I just want to make sure that when authorities legalize a substance for use in pain control it is effective and not just profitable snake oil for a strong lobby of well-healed and crafty businesspeople.

Tamsulosin and the Risk of Dementia

The journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published and reviewed in the online journal Primary Care which examines whether men with enlarged prostates and symptoms of prostatism develop dementia more frequently if they take the drug tamsulosin to relieve the symptoms. As men age, under the influence of male hormones, the three lobed prostate normally increases in size. As the prostate enlarges, it impedes the flow of urine as it attempts to leave the bladder. Patients feel urgency, hesitancy, dribbling, sometimes leaking and a diminished stream. Sleep-awakening night time urination becomes an issue as well as difficulty fully emptying the bladder.  Minimal night time urine production produces the urge to void.

There are many non-pharmacological surgical treatments for this normal, age related, condition. Medications have been used for years to try to prevent surgery or defer it to a later date. tamsulosin works by inhibiting certain receptors on the muscle in the prostate causing relaxation of smooth muscle and increased flow of urine. The study authors used Medicare data to look at men aged 66 and older taking tamsulosin to reduce symptoms of an enlarged prostate. They compared these men to others taking no medication for BPH and to those taking medications that work by a different mechanism of action including terazosin, doxazosin, alfuzosin, dutasteride and finesteride. The data was collected from years 2006 – 2012.

The results showed that men taking tamsulosin had a propensity for negative changes in cognitive function at a higher rate than men taking other products. This was clearly not a straight cause and effect study proving that tamsulosin causes cognitive dysfunction. The authors and reviewers in accompanying editorials point out the many variables and flaws which may have contributed to the conclusion but emphasize that further defining studies need to be started to clear up the doubt raised by this review.

A VA study done years ago comes to mind in which Veterans who ultimately switched from medications for an enlarged prostate underwent surgery and were interviewed one year later about their feelings about the results and function after surgery. Almost 100% of the study group felt better after surgery and relieved that the side effects of their medications for an enlarged prostate were a thing of the past. They wondered why they waited so long to have surgery and felt they would have asked for it sooner had they realized the many ill effects the medication was causing. It may be time for a more aggressive approach to prostate surgery as opposed to medical treatment?

Commercial Air Travel is Really Safe

For the last 25 years I have had the privilege of being a designated airman medical examiner by the Federal Aviation Administration. To earn that privilege, it required flying to FAA headquarters and taking a one week training course followed by refresher training material every three years.

The FAA grades medical examiners annually by our judgment and decision-making. The nature of the questions we are required to ask the pilot candidates, and the exam, have been dictated by the rigors of being a pilot and reflect the stresses unique to flying a plane safely. Many of them were created after a plane crash, fatality and the resulting National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation revealed a health reason involved in the crash.

I attended my refresher course in Washington, D.C. this past week over a three-day period. Physicians designated by the FAA fly to the event and stay at their own expense. By law, the FAA is not permitted to pay for food, coffee or any expenses. Over 50% of the attendee physicians are pilots who fly to the conference in their own private planes. There are about 2,800 physicians performing these exams around the world and, judging by the grey hairs, and canes in the crowd; they are getting significantly older reflecting the same process in the physician population in our country.

This was the first time I attended this meeting and I saw a significant number of women physicians in the audience which makes me believe there is diversity in the physician examining population as well. The speakers on medical topics are first rate. We heard from leading doctors at the best places, all leaders in aerospace medicine and research in cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, fatigue and sleep medicine. I learn a great deal of general medicine to bring back to my medical practice medicine at these sessions.

Performing FAA exams for pilots is not a particularly lucrative proposition. You see 3 classes of candidates including the commercial pilots for class 1 exams, navigators for class 2 exams and general aviation or civilian private pilots for class 3.

As our pilot population continues to age, domestic airlines are now retiring them at age 65. If perfectly healthy, a class 1 pilot starts getting EKGs annually at age 39 and they are then seen every six months at a minimum. The exam and paperwork takes 45 minutes at least and must be transmitted back to the FAA by computer. If you detect a problem either by your taking a history, or performing an exam, there is a further investment of time and research to provide the FAA safety experts with the medical records they need to determine if the pilot is healthy enough to safely fly a plane.

I would say the vast majority of examiners charge only $175 or less for these exams. Try getting that time, attention and value when you go to most physicians for an exam.

The reward for being a designated airman medical examiner is being part of a team that keeps the skies safe for the flying public. Seeing accident and mortality rates decrease year after year brings an extraordinary sense of satisfaction. I get to work with extraordinarily talented and dedicated employees of the FAA, from the staff at my Regional Flight Surgeons headquarters in Atlanta, and the professionals in Oklahoma City and D.C. who read, train and study so when I fly from place to place, I arrive there intact after an uneventful flight. There you have it. Commercial air travel is really safe.